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When an environment changes, a multi celled organism can lose some cells without it producing an equal evolutionary change. But when a single cell organism experiences the same environmental pressure change, its life or death.

So single celled populations should evolve in direct relation to the environmental changes, while multi celled populations would evolve only in response to large scale environment changes.

If we are infected by the single cell organism, and it manages to insert highly evolved genes into one of our stem cells, then is it possible for these genes to insert in the correct place and upgrade our genetic code with new adaptions to the minor environmental changes?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Remi.b, AliceD, MattDMo, anongoodnurse, kmm Jul 28 '16 at 2:04

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE. The question is unclear to me. It is a little hard to pinpoint to what is unclear and there's little I understand. Here are two points. (1) lose some cells without it producing an equal evolutionary change I don't understand what you mean by evolutionary change here. (2) what do you mean by highly evolved genes. I think the start by saying that organisms of different size often face environmental variations at different scale (which is true). Then you seem to talk about parasitology but I am not sure what your question is. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Jul 27 '16 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ As you are using terms and expression that are never used within the field of evolution biology (such as upgrade our genetic code or evolved genes), I think you might want to follow an introductory course to evolutionary biology such as Understanding Evolution by UC Berkeley for example. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Jul 27 '16 at 20:47
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    $\begingroup$ If the question is "do populations evolve in response to parasites", then the short answer is "yes". $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Jul 27 '16 at 20:52
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But when a single cell organism experiences the same environmental pressure change, its life or death.

Do you understand that evolution is not about changes to individual organisms? It's about changes to populations of organisms

So single celled populations should evolve in direct relation to the environmental changes, while multi celled populations would evolve only in response to large scale environment changes.

I have no idea what you mean here. If you mean "A little DDT won't cause any changes to DDT resistance in a population of mosquitos", you are just wrong. If you mean "A global climate temperature increase of 1 degree won't affect polar bear populations at all", that's wrong.

If we are infected by the single cell organism, and it manages to insert highly evolved genes into one of our stem cells,

Can you start with some evidence that this every happens? Or any evidence that it happens often enough to be a common driver of evolution? (Note that viruses are not organisms)

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