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After some thinking, I am wondering if having a 30% atmospheric oxygen concentration (or some other concentration) for a short time would increase the regeneration of energy in a body? It seems like it does have some mental effects, but I haven't found any other positive effects on the body.

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  • $\begingroup$ what positive effects have you found? can you add those sources to the question? $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Jul 28 '16 at 19:08
  • $\begingroup$ Giving someone oxygen, who has had COPD for a while, could be fatal. $\endgroup$ – user27740 Nov 26 '16 at 21:15
  • $\begingroup$ You can't really go by simple percentages. It's generally the partial pressure that matters, so for instance the FAA requires pilots of non-pressurized aircraft to use supplemental oxygen above IIRC 14,000 ft. (And no whining about non-metric: the FAA regulation says feet :-)) OTOH, using normal air for deep diving can cause oxygen toxicity - though nitrogen narcosis generally happens before that's a problem. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Jan 26 '17 at 5:15
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Humans are pretty well suited to a 21% oxygen atmosphere (at STP). It's what our lungs are used to dealing with, and it's what brings the appropriate amount of oxygen to our brain (in particular, most organs are more forgiving, although not a lot more).

A lower concentration grows quickly and strictly deleterious, leading in short order to hypoxia, subsequently death. A higher concentration is also deleterious, leading initially to an oxygen high (as seen with Oxygen Bars), but also causing vision problems, seizures and death.

Oxygen is also highly reactive, and increased concentrations for even short bursts could, if frequent, lead to cancers, especially lung cancer. (The primary cause of lung cancer prior to asbestos and smoking? Breathing.).

There are cases in which increased oxygen concentration can be beneficial, but they are rare and specialised.

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