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In the metabolic pathways, each of the reaction needs an enzyme(protein) in order to occur successfully. Is there any quantitative measure that can be associated to this enzyme? Like synthesis rate of enzyme, degradation rate, mRNA transcription rate, enzyme activity, amount of enzyme present per unit measure of protein in the cell and if there is rate of generation of the enzyme's product, the rate of production of this enzyme in the human body, etc? I wanted to know the list of features that can quantify enzyme activity in the cell.

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closed as too broad by MattDMo, rg255, WYSIWYG Jul 31 '16 at 11:15

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Your question is very unclear. There are plenty of quantitative measures when looking at a particular protein - synthesis rate vs. degradation rate, mRNA transcription rate, enzyme activity, amount of enzyme present per unit measure of protein in the cell, rate of generation of the enzyme's product, and on and on and on. Please edit your question and explain exactly what you're doing and what kind of data you're looking for. This is definitely an XY problem. $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Jul 29 '16 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ @MattDMo edited the question. Is it clearer now? $\endgroup$ – girl101 Jul 30 '16 at 1:50
  • $\begingroup$ This is very broad. Measures of abundance and synthesis rate of enzymes (and other proteins) can be found in proteomics work such as the paper mentioned by @tsttst below. Measurement of enzyme activity is completely different, and is often studied using isotope-labeled metabolites in a technique known as metabolic flux analysis, see for example msb.embopress.org/content/2/1/62.abstract Both are large, active research fields. $\endgroup$ – Roland Jul 30 '16 at 8:37
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  • Your question already answers a fundamental point: namely that there are several distinct quantitative measures that can be associated with enzymes (the list could also be extended, and you will discover more in biochemical textbooks...).
  • If experimentally or theoretically accessible, one additional important quantity is the formation of product over time divided by biomass ( e.g.: Jacob et Monod 1961)
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  • $\begingroup$ I wanted to know all those points and how they are calculated... $\endgroup$ – girl101 Jul 30 '16 at 2:40
  • $\begingroup$ Note that the more direct quantitative measures usually require enzyme-specific experimental assays (and measuring the activity within cells usually is even one step up - and something that has only been achieved for very few enzymes). If you want to look at quantitative measures, which can be measured well for most enzymes (and quantities that can be estimated reasonably well by models based on those measures), you could find them (for some cell lines and growth conditions) in Schwannäusser et al. 2011 nature.com/nature/journal/v473/n7347/full/nature10098.html $\endgroup$ – tsttst Jul 30 '16 at 3:02

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