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C.elegans is a very well studied organism. Of its approximately 1000 cells in the adult stage, how many of each cell type are there? The only information I could grab from the internet (wormatlas.org) is that there are about 300 neurons. What about the rest of the cells? An answer for other simple animals such as sponges, planaria, jellyfish etc., even in relative proportion of cells, would be accepted.

(I appreciate that this question is somewhat broad and unspecific: eg. are all neurons of the same type? (Yes) Are germ cells included? (No, because they vary) Please ignore such niceties.)

Edit: To clarify, the question asks for a breakdown of the cells along the lines of: Neurons 300 cells, Epithelium 200 cells, etc., Total 1000 cells

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    $\begingroup$ I guess you didn't find this page, then? I'm not a worm biologist, so how did I find such information? I googled list of c elegans cell types. PLEASE do your own research before asking here. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Commented Aug 27, 2016 at 13:38
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    $\begingroup$ @MattDMo You should make an answer out of the link you post. An answer as simple as There are about n types of cell (see here) would be enough. $\endgroup$
    – Remi.b
    Commented Aug 27, 2016 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ The cell map of C.elegans is well known. $\endgroup$
    – WYSIWYG
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 10:02
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, did I ask "How many cell types are there in C.elegans?" No I did NOT want a list of cell types. PLEASE read the question carefully before answering. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 13:04
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    $\begingroup$ -1 and VTC because this question is unclear (what exact do you define as a "cell type"?) and easily answerable yourself once you have a clear definition. $\endgroup$
    – March Ho
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 20:49

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Thanks to @MattDMo comment...

There are about 17 cell types in hermaphrodites C. elegans (see here). However, it varies very much depending how you count. You might want to have a look at Sulston and White (1988).

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