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At least I believe it's a chrysalis. I found it hanging from my gate the other day.

I'm in Western Arkansas:

enter image description here

More photos here

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you provide approximate size? (or is it too late? :p). Also, if you have nay additional photos they would be helpful. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Jan 31 '17 at 4:11
  • $\begingroup$ it's about 1.5". I actually posted this elsewhere, I forget the exact species but it's the kind that glues sticks and bark to itself as camouflage. $\endgroup$ – Wayne Werner Jan 31 '17 at 4:13
  • $\begingroup$ My guess is a bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis). University of Arkasnsas has a page about these "pests" $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Jan 31 '17 at 4:16
  • $\begingroup$ @theforestecologist yes, that was it $\endgroup$ – Wayne Werner Jan 31 '17 at 5:28
  • $\begingroup$ Wayne or @theforestecologist why don't you write an answer and mark it as resolved? $\endgroup$ – Tyto alba Feb 2 '17 at 18:24
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Based on the image and location, I'd say you've got the chrysalis of a bagworm moth (family Psychidae) or some related species of case-building moth.

There are over 1350 species of Psychidae, and I am not certain of the exact species.

Caterpillars of this family are known to create protective cases out of local debris. Because this debris can vary, so too will the appearance of the case. Different species likewise prefer to use different materials. Sticks, leaves, tree scales, etc. have all been known to be used in their chrysalii. As a result, Googling for images should produce a wide variety of chrysalis structures. Here is one example using Eastern Redcedar scales in NC:

enter image description here

The University of Arkasnsas has a locally-relevant page about Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, one species that is often considered a "pest".

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