1
$\begingroup$

This question is similar to a previous question, but is not the same.

I was told, you are born with a bacteria in your digestive track that are made by the body. Can a body in development create it's own bacteria from nothing? Also said by the teacher the first time you take an antibiotic it is gone forever? Can a body in development create it own bacteria from stem cells? Is there such a bacteria, can it be cultured and re-introduced into the body?

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

No, no human (or any other eukaryote lineage) are able to "create bacteria". The story you were told is wrong.

However and interestingly, female parasitoid wasps seem to "create viruses" (Herniou et al. 2013). The viruses are part of the wasp genome (lysogenic phase) and detach (lytic phase) in the ovaries only. The viruses, then infect the caterpillar in which the mother lay its eggs. The viruses ensure to reduce the immune system of the caterpillar in order to protect the wasp egg (and later larvae) and ensure its development to adulthood.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Whoever told you this story is wrong. Bacteria are prokaryotic single celled organisms, humans are eukaroytic multicellular organisms. These are so different, that it is impossible to convert one into the other.

When babies are born, their digestive tract is sterile (see reference 1 for details and a huge amount of additional references). However, it is colonized by different species of bacteria in a matter of hours, depending on the delivery and also the feeding methods.

References:

  1. Newborn baby digestive tract
  2. Postnatal Development of Intestinal Microflora as Influenced by Infant Nutrition
  3. Why is initial bacterial colonization of the intestine important to the infant’s and child’s health?
$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Pasteur and Redi disproved spontaneous generation a century ago. So no, babies are not magically making bacteria in their guts.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.