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What are the reasons for the oversecretion of thyroxin in the thyroid glands? Its name was mentioned in my book but there was no explanation.

What are its symptoms,can it be fatal?

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    $\begingroup$ what book? where else have you looked? this is a relatively straightforward question/answer if you search the internet... $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Oct 13 '16 at 15:32
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Elevated levels of thyroid hormone in the blood is called thyrotoxicosis. If this is due to a hyperfunction of the thyroid gland, it is known as hyperthyroidism. In common parlance, these terms are often interchanged.

Although a simple google search would tell you more, I add some detail here.

Hyperthyroid can have various causes. There can be a functional cancerous/ non-cancerous mass in the thyroid gland producing the hormone. Or as in graves disease which is an autoimmune condition where antibodies mimic to stimulate the thyroid gland to hyperfunction.

Non hyperthyroid causes of thyrotoxicosis include inflammation of thyroid or thyroiditis, where preformed hormone is released. It can also occur sometimes in a condition called struma ovarii where the tumor in the ovary turns into a thyroid like mass producing the hormone. Another possible case is an iatrogenic one where the the problem is due to the patient taking exogenous thyroid hormone.

Thyrotoxicosis is not fatal and can be controlled by drugs. Symptoms include cardiac problems, high BMR, ocular changes (bulging eyes), diarrhea and many more. A special case of Graves disease called thyroid storm is a medical emergency and can be fatal.

Heres the medscape link for further reference. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/121865-overview

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  • $\begingroup$ what is a thyroid thaw? $\endgroup$ – atri majumdar Oct 13 '16 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ There can be a functional cancerous/ non-cancerous mass in the thyroid thaws producing the hormone. $\endgroup$ – atri majumdar Oct 13 '16 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ Typo there! Corrected :) $\endgroup$ – Polisetty Oct 13 '16 at 15:44
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    $\begingroup$ Your answers are usually of much better quality than this one, which has a lot of errors. It makes me wonder if you actually read the medscape article. -1 (Sorry) $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Oct 13 '16 at 17:18
  • $\begingroup$ @anongoodnurse I actually wrote this up from Robbins pathology. I gave the Medscape one as an online reference. Frankly speaking I dint read i dint read it. Anyway, could you please point out the errors? $\endgroup$ – Polisetty Oct 13 '16 at 17:39

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