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I have seen this on Corsica (Island of France):

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  • $\begingroup$ If possible to go near that-one individual tree once again (don't take pressure; just if possible); take few fruits, photograph a TS and an LS (just in a way we cut tomato in halves) that would help understand carpels. If you find any flower in the tree it would be very helpful. Take few close-up of twigs, so that i can try to understand apical buds, axial buds leaf-bases, stipules (if any), sheath-like structure (if any), etc. Usually high-resolution (many kb or megapixel) images do NO help than defocus; Actually just how much "fingerprints" you captured and presented, come in work. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 19 '16 at 15:21
  • $\begingroup$ I'm sorry if I use much terminologies (due to brief place) about whom you are unfamiliar... I was just trying to give you a hint about what may come into work. Plants are not so-simple as may look to a beginner. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 19 '16 at 17:55
  • $\begingroup$ @AlwaysConfused I'm sorry, but I'm not several 100km away from it. However, in the future I will think about cutting the fruit and photographing it. Thank you for the hint. $\endgroup$ – Martin Thoma Oct 19 '16 at 18:34
  • $\begingroup$ But don't try to taste if there is any place of doubt. As well, I'm not familiar with Arbutus unedo, and there exists scope of wrong-identification (one example you have seen few days ago) even sometimes by experts; and when identification is via photos, web or such, the chances of mistake are more. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 19 '16 at 18:49
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It is Arbutus unedo, called "strawberry tree" in English, "arbousier" in French and "medronheiro" in Portuguese. The fruits are ripe around October or November. They are full of little seeds, but if you bear the annoyance, they can be quite tasty. They are used to distill an alcohol in Portugal.

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    $\begingroup$ Arbutus unedo (member of Ericaceae according to wikipedia) is not to be confused with commonly whom we know as strawberry which is Fragaria cultivars, is a member of rosaceae. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 19 '16 at 8:21
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The fruit looks like lychee (Litchi chinensis). But this was a hasty guess and now I see that there is a much better answer here!

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(image from Wikipedia)

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    $\begingroup$ The leaves look different. Lytchee have a kind of crust that can be peeled. This is not the case with Arbutus. Besides, I'm not sure they can grow in Corsica. $\endgroup$ – bli Oct 18 '16 at 12:01
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    $\begingroup$ You're probably right! I was misled by the fruits. In the Wikipedia it says "They require a warm subtropical to tropical climate that is cool but also frost-free or with only slight winter frosts not below −4 °C" $\endgroup$ – picapica Oct 18 '16 at 12:20
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    $\begingroup$ Please don't delete the Litchi answer, since it would help a lot the visitors. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 18 '16 at 13:36
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    $\begingroup$ @WYSIWYG The discussion below an erroneous answer might be useful. And it is useful to know that one might make this kind of confusion between lychee and Arbutus. But maybe it would be better to edit the answer to warn the reader. $\endgroup$ – bli Oct 18 '16 at 15:20
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    $\begingroup$ i added a note about being wrong. the downvotes should also be a good indication to not listen to me! $\endgroup$ – picapica Oct 18 '16 at 22:41

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