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enter image description here

I found her underneath a big rock along with a bunch of much smaller Lasius niger workers, so I suspect it might be a queen. I know Lasius niger doesn't have soldiers, so what could it have been doing there if it wasn't their queen? Also, sorry for the bad picture quality, I couldn't find a better camera, and also don't have a proper magnifying glass.

Country: Belgium

Environment: forest

Location: underneath big rock

Behaviour: calm when walking in lighted up areas

Species it was found with: Lasius niger workers running around frantically (note: this specimen was much bigger than the workers)

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    $\begingroup$ Wikihow > How to identify a queen ant might be a good first series of step to determine if it is queen. I suggest that you address the questions of this article into your post. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Oct 19 '16 at 15:01
  • $\begingroup$ In which country and which environment (forest, prairie, ...) did you find it? $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Oct 19 '16 at 15:02
  • $\begingroup$ I know what a queen looks like, i've had many lasius niger and flavus colonys in the past, i've only never seached in forrests before. $\endgroup$ – Bunyan van Asten Oct 19 '16 at 15:12
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    $\begingroup$ You given many useful information. But you didn't mention its size, even approximate size. (From the appearance of cotton it seems to be within 5 mm to 1.5 cm but no better cue is there. Btw what do you mean by "Found with other insects: yes"? did you mean it was in a herd of similar-other ants? or you mean it was found mixed with insects of other species? $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Oct 19 '16 at 18:59
  • $\begingroup$ I dunno what i meant, with that, i'll remove it, but it's larger than 6mm, and smaller than 1cm, she's moving around very franticly when i try to measure her legnth. $\endgroup$ – Bunyan van Asten Oct 19 '16 at 19:13
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This ant looks very much like a Camponotus pennsylvanicus queen, but since it was found in a Belgian forest, I could be wrong. I am almost certain it is a Camponotus species though. I hope I could have been helpful to you!

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