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I was studying "Action Potential" and this question crossed my mind. Another question is that, "Why does the action potential not occur in Schwann cells, or if it does, how does it occur?" I know that many animal cell membranes have this pump, but I was not sure about this one.

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Yes. Although utilizing the action potential is not in their function, Schwann cells do have Na/K ATPases. In fact all animal cells do. It contributes to the resting membrane potential in neural networks, with regards to Schwann cells, and prevent differences in osmotic pressure from disrupting the cells.

As for your second question, action potentials do not occur in Schwann cells as there is nowhere for this "impulse" to travel to. A localized depolarization is not an action potential. Papers such as this, and this suggest that voltage-gated ion channels in Schwann cells serve complex and specific purposes such as inducing myelin formation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please do add some references. $\endgroup$
    – L.B.
    Oct 28 '16 at 16:07
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    $\begingroup$ "All three α-subunit isoforms are expressed in the CNS but to varying extents in different regions and cell types. The α1 isoform appears in glia, Schwann cells, choroid plexus epithelium and some neurons." link $\endgroup$
    – Liu Tianyi
    Oct 28 '16 at 16:19
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Sorry put simply yes. Schwann cell, also called neurilemma cell, any of the cells in the peripheral nervous system that produce the myelin sheath around neuronal axons. Schwann cells are named after German physiologist Theodor Schwann, who discovered them in the 19th century. As such of it function an action potential is needed.

The principal primary active transport system in neurons, as in most other animal cells, is a P-type pump that concurrently extrudes Na+ and accumulates K+. For brevity, we will refer to it as the Na,K-ATPase. Depending on their functions, different tissues have vastly different requirements for pumping Na+ and K+. Transport by Na,K-ATPases is specifically inhibited by cardiac glycosides, such as ouabain.

http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-myelin-sheath-schwann-cells-nodes-of-ranvier.html

enter link description here

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    $\begingroup$ The purpose of the Schwann cells is to promote saltatory conduction whereby the action potential, in the neuron, "skips past" the Schwann cell to initiate an action potential at the next node between Schwann cells. The diffusion of ions in the short distance between Schwann cells is faster than the contiguous propagation of the action potential. $\endgroup$
    – bpedit
    Oct 26 '16 at 15:29
  • $\begingroup$ @Martin Anderson, -1 as you haven't answered the question of whether schwann cells have Na,K-ATPase pumps. I don't believe they do as it is unnecessary for their function (which bpedit outlines above). If you edit the answer I'll change the downvote to an upvote. $\endgroup$
    – Michael_A
    Oct 26 '16 at 19:06
  • $\begingroup$ -1. You seem to have just pieced together unrelated facts about Schwann cells and copy-pasted citation text without reference to the question at all. Consider deleting your response. $\endgroup$
    – Liu Tianyi
    Oct 29 '16 at 19:48

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