-2
$\begingroup$

Fruits are decomposed by bacteria well.

Although bacteria need water more than other foods, why isn't water decomposed well like food?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by anongoodnurse, mgkrebbs, WYSIWYG Nov 23 '16 at 6:07

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ -1, this question makes no sense. What do you mean by water decay? I wouldn't define water as a 'food', do you have a reference that does? $\endgroup$ – Michael_A Nov 23 '16 at 1:19
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ To me the question indeed make some sense. "Water is inert" that is a wrong concept. Water is biologically very active and it take part in all biological pathways. But all the biochemical pathways also give out water in so many places... so water on Earth never finishes as some-other by-product like H2 + O2. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Nov 23 '16 at 10:24
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Though those fruit-rotting bacteria requires much watery condition; a large amount of water (on gross); goes to keep the bacterial cytoplasm fluidy. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Nov 23 '16 at 10:30
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Interesting thing I found in this question; if all the water got "degraded" by the bacteria into H2 + O2 ; all liquid water would finish up from Earth. However likely bacteria would not go to waste their energy via such a thermodynamically unfavorable 'endergonic' process. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Nov 23 '16 at 10:34
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Perfectly good question, for any adult teacher, to understand and answer. Pontification is not the mission of moderators. Clarification IS. Fruits contain cells and sugar which can be eaten by millions of organisms. Water is like rock, an element, and it can only give food to as many animals as it has CO2, N2, Mg, Ca, And other cell constituents dissolved in it. If the water is rich in dissolved rocks and nitrogen, it will produce a lot of life. Stagnant water is older and gives life an easier place to live, and is less filtered by algea. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Nov 23 '16 at 10:43
0
$\begingroup$

It is unclear what you mean by "decay".

Water is not an organic compound (it contains no carbon). It is just $H_2O$. Water cannot rot! Water is typically not considered as "food" as it is not a source of carbon.

Living organisms can split water molecule (through photosynthesis typically, see wiki > water splitting) and synthesize water molecule (through formation of carbon polymers typically) but I doubt this is what you were thinking about.

Note that if you leave water with a source of carbon (dirty water) somewhere, many organisms will be happy to colonize this environment.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ -1, I can't see any value in answer a question that is totally unclear. $\endgroup$ – Michael_A Nov 23 '16 at 2:01
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I've got another answer from other site, water has no nutritious value. So as you mentioned, in dirty water, bacteria can colonize. Hence we can leave a bottle of water on a desk for a long time. Probably dirty water can be decayed. But the bottled water has also an expiration date, right? I was curious for it. Thanks anyway. $\endgroup$ – Solek Nov 23 '16 at 2:52
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Michael_A An answer should not be judged based on the question. It is not easy to ask clear questions on subject you know little about. I have asked a lot of unclear questions and comments and short answers have helped me even if the question ends up being closed. It would be silly to rebuke any attempt at helping someone just because (s)he failed to formulate a clear question (except maybe when the post clearly shows lack of effort). $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Nov 23 '16 at 3:14
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Solek Based on your comment, I feel like you are still thinking that water can be decayed. That expiration date on the water bottles is for the plastic that starts leaching chemicals into water. Example can be found in this paper here. Water can be contaminated with waste but not decayed. $\endgroup$ – Kiritee Gak Nov 23 '16 at 5:45
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Remi.b actually, answers should be judged based on the question. From How do I write a good answer? in the help center, Answer well-asked questions. Not all questions can or should be answered here. $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Nov 23 '16 at 17:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.