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My current theory to test for the destruction of any DNA that may be used as forensic evidence is to use an egg white. I would like to test various myths and methods for destroying DNA evidence and need a sure-fire method of testing whether or not the DNA is destroyed. The reasoning behind the egg white is because when you cook one or expose it to strong acids or bases, it turns white. Indicating the denaturing of the proteins within the whites. Would this work to test for the denaturing of DNA molecules to? Several experiments would be conducted with each method, using egg whites to determine whether or not the DNA would be destroyed. Would egg whites, with great accuracy, determine whether or not the sample can be identified. If not, could you please suggest another alternative?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by anongoodnurse, AliceD, WYSIWYG Dec 6 '16 at 8:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ just a side note: do you want to destroy DNA (e.g. remove traces of DNA presence) or damage it so that investigator won't be able to assign given DNA to particular person? $\endgroup$ – aaaaaa Dec 6 '16 at 2:00
  • $\begingroup$ @aaaaaa First I'd try damaging DNA and then move on to removing any trace of it. $\endgroup$ – Tommy Woldt Dec 6 '16 at 2:10
  • $\begingroup$ what is the end goal of this project? BTW this community does not support illegal activities $\endgroup$ – aaaaaa Dec 6 '16 at 2:15
  • $\begingroup$ @aaaaaa Mabye create a youtube series and destroy the myltiple biohazardous samples ive collected from myself over the past month. $\endgroup$ – Tommy Woldt Dec 6 '16 at 2:32
  • $\begingroup$ This isn't a valid test as egg white contains a lot of proteins and DNA is chemically completely different. For example you can heat DNA several times to 95°C and you will not damage it (in fact it renaturates when cooled down slow enough), but this is not possible with proteins. "Biohazard samples" (whatever this means in your case) are deactivated either by autoclaving or by incubating the cells/tubes/whatever with chlorine bleach. Both methods work well and are approved in labs. $\endgroup$ – Chris Dec 6 '16 at 7:16
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Cooking DNA will absolutely not destroy it. Few things will actually destroy DNA. Bleach is one of the only common substances that will do it.

To test for DNA quantity you need to perform qPCR. The equipment is $20,000+.

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