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If total number of chromosome in the cell is x, then for-example;

Are all animals diploid (x= 2n) ?

Are all fungi haploid (x= n) ?

Are all plants diploid (x= 2n) ?

Are all Protists diploid (x= 2n) ?

Also, what is the ploidy of archaea and bacteria?

Thank you very much.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is diploid = 2n your example for polyploidy in humans? $\endgroup$ Dec 17, 2016 at 9:29
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    $\begingroup$ as a short hint, 1. yes ploidy means number of the chromosome set. (However, "basic-number of chromosome" and "haploid chromosome number" are 2 different thing). 2. Many protists are haploid. Many protists , all plants and some animals (like cnidarian eg jellyfish) show 'alternation of generation'. I. e. they have more than one life-forms in different generations (eg. sporophytic generation and gametophytic generations of plants) that have difference in chromosome number (not possible to discuss in a comment). I'll write an elaborate ans later. $\endgroup$
    – user25568
    Dec 17, 2016 at 11:01
  • $\begingroup$ As well, though the question contains many short parts, still in my view this one question seeks a single thing clear yet brief understanding about ploidy concept (all others are just examples from some discrete domains of life). so I think this question is not too-broad. However only 1 unclear thing is the variable x here is not explained, that could yet be improved. $\endgroup$
    – user25568
    Dec 17, 2016 at 11:27
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    $\begingroup$ @AlwaysConfused I think the OP is referring to total number of chromosome (not pairs) as x. $\endgroup$ Dec 17, 2016 at 17:20
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    $\begingroup$ Could I request reopen so that I could post a more detailed answer? I think instead yes/no, quite elaboration would be more useful. For example; many fungi show a "dikaryotic" (n+n) phase. In members with alternation of generation, we cannot use the term "this is a diploid species" or "this is a haploid species". Because unlike our eggs or sperms (n) which couldn't be considered as a "generation"; their meiotic products can stay & divide as a clear-cut "generation". (as well alternation of generation could be triphasic, too). If I get few day for library work I could try make better reference $\endgroup$
    – user25568
    Dec 20, 2016 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

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Are all animals haploid (n=x) ?

No

Are all fungi haploid (n=x) ?

No

Are all plants diploid (2n=x) ?

No

Are all Protists diploid (2n=x) ?

No

Also, what is the ploidy of archaea and bacteria?

Generally speaking, Bacteria and Archaea don't have chromosomes (but have circular DNA). As such the question of ploidy does not really apply to them.

You might want to read about Biological life cycle to understand the terms haplontic, diplontic, haplodiplontic (and other similar terms).

Ploidy level can easily varies among species of the same family (typically in plants for which hybridization is common). There is no reason to expect that a taxon as big as "fungi" (for example) would all have the same level of ploidy.

Note that your question that all animals are haploids is surprising as you just described that humans are diploids.

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    $\begingroup$ Just want to add that it's certainly possible to talk about bacterial ploidy -- in fact there's a huge amount of variation in how many copies of their chromosome they maintain. $\endgroup$ Dec 22, 2016 at 0:59
  • $\begingroup$ @VictorChubukov Thanks. I don't know much about that. Do you know a good reference for further investigations? $\endgroup$
    – Remi.b
    Dec 24, 2016 at 11:01
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In animal, reproductive cells are haploid for human

Male bees, wasps, and ants are haploid because of the way they develop: from unfertilized, haploid eggs

some fungi are also haploid

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    $\begingroup$ bhakti - can you add some references to your answer? we appreciate that very much on BiologySE and it will strengthen your answer greatly $\endgroup$ Dec 17, 2016 at 17:58

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