I have often found bisphosphate compounds ( e.g. RuBP, RuBisCO, 2,3-BPGA etc.) and diphosphate compounds (e.g. ADP, GDP etc.) in biochemistry. They are commonly seen and are important compounds in both animals and plants but what is the basic difference between a bisphosphate and a diphosphate?

  • For example fructose 1,6 bisphosphate is used in step four of glycolysis but d location of the phosphate group has been mentioned already ,1 telling us carbon 1 and 6 telling us carbon 6(no offence) but i think its the same thing as bisphosphate.💜 – Empress May 1 '17 at 12:40
up vote 15 down vote accepted

enter image description here

[Source:Wikipedia]

As you can see in the above structure of ADP(Adenosine di-phosphate), the two phosphate groups in the compound are directly attached to one another. So it is named as di-phosphate. [Source] You can see this table for more examples.

enter image description here

[Source:Wikipedia]

In this structure of RuBP(Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate), the two phosphate groups in the compound are not directly attached to one another, they are attached to first and fifth carbon, meaning they are attached to different atoms. Therefore, it is named as bis-phosphate. [Source](2nd comment)

  • 4
    I believe this is the correct distinction, but historically the two terms have been used interchangeably. As an example, a lot of biologists will still refer to 2,3-BPG as 2,3-DPG. – Victor Chubukov Jan 30 '17 at 19:46

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.