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Regardless of region, earth's tilt results in yearly seasonal changes, which organisms deal with through processes like migration/hibernation. Both seem like attempts to avoid the extreme fluctuations... so why haven't certain organisms developed environmentally-reactive bodies, changing with the seasons throughout the year (based on measures like temperature- I.E., additional fur growth during the winter), and why hasn't this continued as an evolutionary advantage to allow organisms to thrive in longer environmental ranges (like staying in place instead of migrating) or even go a step beyond and take advantage of the qualities specific to each season?

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marked as duplicate by David, AliceD, another 'Homo sapien', kmm, WYSIWYG Feb 20 '17 at 12:59

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    $\begingroup$ What on Earth makes you think they haven't? Certainly my dogs & horses grow much thicker coats during the winter, and shed them during the spring. I believe that's true of many wild animals - e.g. fur trappers think winter pelts are better quality. Also a number of Arctic animals change color, becoming white during the winter. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Feb 1 '17 at 4:54
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    $\begingroup$ @jamesqf it's also true of humans. For example, small capillaries are rerouted away from the skin after spending time in cold weather and back towards it if spending time in the heat. $\endgroup$ – terdon Feb 1 '17 at 15:14
  • $\begingroup$ @jamesqf great information. Can you think of any reasons migration has been favored over more extreme body-variations regarding these seasonal changes? Is there an advantage to moving as opposed to staying put? Most animals are constantly on the move regardless and I assume that's an advantage in survival. $\endgroup$ – Taytee13 Feb 1 '17 at 15:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Taytee: I think (I'm certainly no expert) that it'd mostly be a matter of food supply. If you're a large grazing animal, in winter your food is dead grass under the snow, so it's economically beneficial to migrate. (Also migration can be between elevations in mountain ranges.) Likewise if you're a seed/fruit eating bird, or a nectar-sipping hummingbird. It's easier to go where there's food, than to try to survive a foodless winter. Same reason bears &c hibernate. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Feb 2 '17 at 18:16
  • $\begingroup$ @jamesqf totally makes sense! Animals likely migrated historically due to reasons along those lines, and since those specific species migrated and ended up in an acceptable environment again, it was never beneficial to develop a focus of seasonally-reactive biology. Interesting to note as well that it may be an early sign of animals engaging in a behavioral pattern to solve a problem instead of leaving it up to natural selection. $\endgroup$ – Taytee13 Feb 2 '17 at 18:37
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As Jamesqf pointed out, food supply was likely a big contributor. As a general expansion onto that, I believe a sufficiently reasonable answer could be that animals likely found solutions (I.e. migration and hibernation) to deal could with seasonal factors out of their control (like lack of resources) before natural selection leading to more defined adaption could/would've taken place. Their behavior dealt with the problem- which leads to another interesting idea that it could have been an early sign of organisms using their intelligence to survive and change the course of natural selection.

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