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I'm looking for a simple way (such as a database) so that a program can get the kingdom of a species, knowing its name (such as "Prunus persica"). As a matter of fact the species I'm concerned with are the ones in the miRBase database.

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    $\begingroup$ Bear in mind that since plants and animals use different nomenclatural codes, it is possible (but extremely rare!) for the same species name to be present in both Plantae and Animalia. Here's an example: species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Centropogon_australis $\endgroup$ – Gaurav Feb 5 '17 at 18:39
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    $\begingroup$ @Gaurav huh, really?? I always wondered if this ever happened. cool fact! $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Feb 5 '17 at 18:51
  • $\begingroup$ I've seen several such examples earlier, one can I remember is Acetabularia, an algae; and a fungus (later the name for fungus hasbeen rejected, new name Cyphellopus). IMO there should be some universal rules, too. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Feb 5 '17 at 18:52
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    $\begingroup$ Here's a paper about cross-kingdom homonyms: mapress.com/bionomina/content/2011/f/bn00004p072.pdf $\endgroup$ – Gaurav Feb 5 '17 at 18:53
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You could try the Catalogue of Life

The Catalogue of Life is the most comprehensive and authoritative global index of species currently available. It consists of a single integrated species checklist and taxonomic hierarchy. The Catalogue holds essential information on the names, relationships and distributions of over 1.6 million species. This figure continues to rise as information is compiled from diverse sources around the world.

Catalog of Life Screenshot

You can export the search results (in the above example indicating Kingdom Plantae for search term "Prunus persica") and analyze the exported table in your program of choice.

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