1
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

The bronchiole shown in the section above has folded epithelium, why is this so?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think most of the answers here are wrong. The smooth muscle around the bronchiole can expand and contract, so the epithelium has to have a morphology that allows this. I'm not too familiar with bronchiole histology so I'll keep this as just a comment rather than a full answer, but I wouldn't be surprised if fixation/processing also led to an atypical "constriction" of the bronchioles beyond their normal state in a healthy animal/human. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Feb 7 '17 at 21:26
1
$\begingroup$

Those foldings are called as mucosal folds, formed by the contraction of smooth muscles , are also present in trachea, and in many other organs such as gallbladder etc.

Physiologically: This folding causes an increase in area for better action of mucus which protects the body from entry of dirt, pathogens and loosing the moisture.

Anaomically: as @Bryan pointed out that the folding permits the contraction and relaxation of smooth muscles around the bronchioles.

Source 1

Source 2

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ This is the best answer so far, but it would be much improved if you can find some references to support what you say to make it clear that this is the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Feb 8 '17 at 16:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.