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I have found a large, wild patch, some 200m long, of mainly Datura Stramonium, in our street. I have always been keenly interested and well read on the shamanic, and - very rare - medicinal uses of this species, but scattered amongst them, like family, are two other plants I don't know, but am convinced are also some kind of Datura. I would please like some help on identifying the other two based on the two photos I have of all three.

What I know as the Stramonium Flower

This is the well known - to me - Stramonium flower, the plant characterized by jagged leaves and the well known spiked seed pod of Jimson Weed seeds.

Morning Flory - Flowers, leaf, and other foliage

It looks like user29734's answer is correct, and the above is Morning Glory, but of course subject to confirmation. I now do recognize at least the purple flower as Morning Glory, but from some 30 odd years ago. And it now looks like what I confused with Datura Alba is really just another colour flower of the Morning Glory.

If anyone could please confirm my ID of the Stramonium, and confirm the identification of the second image as morning glory, and suggest what species.

These plants are all around my neighbourhood, with is the northern part of Randburg, South Africa. This city borders on the Northern side of Johannesburg. 1 It's a temperate climate, with very hot and rainy summers, and bitterly cold and dry winters. The soil is reddish and lacks much humus.

It is a semi-rural area, having been rapidly urbanised over the last ten or so years, when it was still just farms and small holdings. Farming is mainly vegetables or lucerne; and lots of maize further out from the city. We are a few km south of the Cradle of Humankind.

1 Strangely enough, there are two cities in the US with the same names, both in California, I believe. I know Johannesburg is.

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    $\begingroup$ Please edit your question and where you saw these plants. Location is often very relevant when attempting to identify species. $\endgroup$ – terdon Feb 9 '17 at 17:07
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    $\begingroup$ Could the second photo be a Convulvulus/Calystegia? $\endgroup$ – RHA Feb 9 '17 at 17:30
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, the second photo looks to me like a morning glory (Ipomoea). Is it a vine? The third appears identical to what I have growing as datura in my own garden. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Feb 9 '17 at 19:49
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    $\begingroup$ @AlwaysConfused The leaves are definitely of the same plant, as I have picked flowers from the same stems as leaves. $\endgroup$ – ProfK Feb 10 '17 at 3:13
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    $\begingroup$ this(https://i.stack.imgur.com/92KbL.png)? quite strongly looks like Datura (as also wrote by @jamesqf). The shape of corolla and calyx looks same as Datura, including projections at margin of corolla. The stamens are same in length; and style is so long... it is quite unexpected in Ipomoea. Also it may look similar to Mirabilis jalapa, but it is not. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Feb 10 '17 at 9:38
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Okay, so as far as the blue and white flower goes I'm pretty sure it's a cultivar of ipomoea called Flying Saucer which is a hybrid of heavenly blue (I. tricolor) and Pearly gates (also I. tricolor) meaning it's a hybrid and no seed output. As far as the white flowers go it is most likely Datura since it is part of a short shrub and the petals are spiked. However you should determine if it blooms at night because its possible it could be moonflower. It may also be brugsmansia or pearly gates. As far as 'alchemical use' datura contains scopolamine which is potentially lethal if consumed in indiscriminate amounts.

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    $\begingroup$ I am only too aware of the potentially fatal and extreme effects of scopolamine, both from extensive study and several very interesting personal experiences. The best treatment for an unexpected or unwanted scopolamine experience is physostigmine and acetylcysteine, for the anticholinergic poisoning, and benzodiazepines for the extremely elevated heart rate. Physostigmine occurs naturally in the Calabar bean. $\endgroup$ – ProfK Feb 10 '17 at 9:08
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The second flower is, I'm guessing by the valentine shaped leaf and violet tubular flowers, a morning glory vine (ipomoea violacea or ipomea tricolor). These plants both are closely related cultivars of ololioqui and tlitlitzen which had a history of shamanic use in southern Mexico.

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  • $\begingroup$ Aaha,, yes, I think I now do recognize that from them growing in a friend's yard when I was very young. So all the psycho-active plants stick together then, like mafiosi. $\endgroup$ – ProfK Feb 10 '17 at 3:11
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    $\begingroup$ @ProfK yes, oddly. The morning glory species contains lysergamide and and it's analogues. However, there is a plant which is native from Carola all the way down to Micronesia called Argyria nervosa which contains the same active principle as the mesoamerican plants. $\endgroup$ – user29734 Feb 10 '17 at 3:16
  • $\begingroup$ I have edited my question, and included much better images of the ipomoea flowers, of two colours, a leaf, and some other foliage at the top of a 700 - 1000 mm high stem where the thin vines with leaves and flowers start. $\endgroup$ – ProfK Feb 10 '17 at 4:41
  • $\begingroup$ That said, as I am studying this plant as an alchemist, where would I locate seeds on the ipomoea? $\endgroup$ – ProfK Feb 10 '17 at 4:42
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    $\begingroup$ The seeds on ipomoea form after the flower dies. It sort of dissolves because of its structure and a bulb begins to grow at the ovule. You can observe this as sepal will begin to bulge. You will begin to see a greenish looking pod emerge but you want to extract the seeds from it only when the pod dries and becomes brown. This is assuming that the plant is not a hybrid. If it has grape shaped leaves and heart shaped leaves it won't produce seeds at all. Fascinating, I suggest you read psychology and alchemy by Jung and gionardo bruno and the hermetic tradition by Frances Yates. Excellent books. $\endgroup$ – user29734 Feb 10 '17 at 7:41
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The top plant looks like it could easily be D. stramonium. Daturas can be a bit tricky. You should either provide an estimate of the scale or measure the flower, then compare with this simple key of invasive Daturas (in Australia): https://www.samorini.it/doc1/alt_aut/ek/haegi.pdf. It helps to note capsule size and shape. (It is NOT a Brugmansia sp.; those are trees with pendant flowers.) Also, the second flower photo seems to me is clearly a morning glory, possibly as IDed by user29734, and the center leaf seems from the same plant(s) or closely related.

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