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Not sure where to ask this question and thought this would the best place. I am not after any opinion or theological, philosophical answers. I am after the science or biology research, experiments or facts. I would like the answer to be focused on the following: Why do we die? With the condition that there are no diseases or any outside factors contributing to death.

In a simpler way, what makes us die biologically, physiologically. Is there a trigger? Is it cellular?.... and so on

As per suggested comment, I have researched genetics such as cell regeneration dynamics, Organ's lives studies. Yet I find very little on the brains involvement, nervous system, chemical or anything else on the multitude of systems we have including triggers or irreversible messages from any or these systems

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of What evolutionary explanations are there for death? $\endgroup$ – KingBoomie Feb 11 '17 at 18:31
  • $\begingroup$ These answers are not what I am looking for! I need a scientific explanation on any level, like cellular or brain chemistry or how many heartbeats there is in a human... that sort of thing $\endgroup$ – user33232 Feb 11 '17 at 18:45
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    $\begingroup$ This answer is too partial and diverges into diseases. Many people just die of old age without diseases and relatively well balanced, yet they still die. $\endgroup$ – user33232 Feb 11 '17 at 19:01
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    $\begingroup$ What research have you done so far to answer your question? $\endgroup$ – have fun Feb 11 '17 at 19:33
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    $\begingroup$ In the absence of disease (including starvation, electrolyte imbalance, etc.), there is no death. Old people die of diseases, even if those diseases went undiagnosed while alive. $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Feb 12 '17 at 15:21
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We die of old age because the biological cost of making us live forever does not improve our chances of passing on our genes. In nature something else would kill us eventually so there was never a reason to evolve the ability to live indefinitely. There are multicellular organism that are biologically immortal(all unicellular are), they live slow low activity lives. A lot of the evolution of more "advanced" life is trading regeneration or longevity for higher activity. Literally live fast die young, leave more offspring.

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