4
$\begingroup$

I know what viruses are. They replicate only inside the living cells, and so on, and so on.

I just interesting maybe there is some progress in this field. I don't know exactly, but I suppose before invention of the nutrient agar microorganisms were cultivated on substrates like eggs, potatoes, meat etc. Perhaps there is the same story for viruses.

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by Tyto alba, another 'Homo sapien', WYSIWYG Feb 20 '17 at 13:13

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy." – Tyto alba, another 'Homo sapien', WYSIWYG
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ No. A virus is a small infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of other organisms. -Wikipedia $\endgroup$ – Tyto alba Feb 19 '17 at 19:34
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ +1'd and it doesn't seem like a homework question. It seems the OP want to tell they knows virus doesn't grow if not in living cell- but if there is any latter-discovery of any virus-like particle growing outside living cell. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Feb 20 '17 at 16:41
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I agree with @AlwaysConfused - I see no reason to close or put this question on hold, it does not seem like a homework question, especially after the OP's recent edits I would suggest the hold be removed. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Feb 21 '17 at 20:05
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Voted to reopen. I was reading a paper from the 30's which claimed to cultivate Vaccinia in the absence of living cells. However a later paper admitted that they couldn't be sure there were no living cells in the media. Of course, given what we now know, contamination with life cells seems most likely. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Feb 22 '17 at 0:46
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ It depends. Some viruses (like Vaccinia used above) are highly complex and would need a cell to be synthesized (with today's tech). If you take simple viruses, say Poliovirus, you could make the RNA and that alone could be infectious if placed in a cell. This isn't a true virus though, more of a viroid. That being said, take PCV, the single protein will self-assemble and incorporate vDNA, while it might not have been done, this could be theoretically be made in vitro. $\endgroup$ – Artem Feb 22 '17 at 0:49

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.