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enter image description here

Source: nbair.res.in

I'm wondering if the first individual on the left is a nymph. Even if not do Nilaparvata sp have wings in nymphal stage?

I'd appreciate any authentic source for reference.

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The family-level identification I had given I now see was unnecessary; the Wikipedia site for an economically important member of the genus (there called the Brown planthopper) is here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_planthopper. The species covered there has long- and short-winged forms; other members of the genus are probably similar. All of the individuals in the photograph above are adult. A late-instar nymph will have wing pads (not yet wings) which are fused to the thoracic segment to which they're attached (a life-cycle diagram with drawings of two nymphal instars -- there are probably more -- is found here: http://www.cpsskerala.in/OPC/pages/ricePestbrownplant.jsp [the eighth slide]). So nymphs and short-winged adults won't be flying out of danger -- they'll be hopping away.

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  • $\begingroup$ So the one on the left's a pre-adult (may be? of short winged form)? Comparing with the wings of short-winged Nilaparvata sp (Photograph-6) it's wings look different, too much gap between them. $\endgroup$
    – Tyto alba
    May 20, 2017 at 18:51
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    $\begingroup$ The different colors of the animal's body and the wing makes me think that if the left-hand example is still a nymph (I'd have to test that idea on a local species--we're on opposite hemisheres) it reached adulthood within a day or two of the photo being taken (either wing-length form would still be possible). $\endgroup$
    – user32396
    May 22, 2017 at 0:30

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