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Is there any particular bacterial lineages which contain a large number of endosymbiotic species and that inhabit a large range of eukaryotic hosts? To me, this would seem to suggest that they are particularly well adapted to becoming endosymbionts.

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    $\begingroup$ Can you give some more background? Which endosymbiotic bacterial linages do you know of from before, and are you interested in any specific types of endosymbiosis in particular? $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Mar 2 '17 at 9:24
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0027909

Members of the genus Xenorhabdus are entomopathogenic bacteria that associate with nematodes. The nematode-bacteria pair infects and kills insects, with both partners contributing to insect pathogenesis and the bacteria providing nutrition to the nematode from available insect-derived nutrients. The nematode provides the bacteria with protection from predators, access to nutrients, and a mechanism of dispersal. Members of the bacterial genus Photorhabdus also associate with nematodes to kill insects, and both genera of bacteria provide similar services to their different nematode hosts through unique physiological and metabolic mechanisms.

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    $\begingroup$ While that's definitely an interesting example of symbiosis, I think the question was more focused on whether there are bacterial lines that are more prone to forming endosymbiotic relationships with diverse species. $\endgroup$ – Harris Mar 2 '17 at 15:36

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