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While I realize this may be difficult without a photo, I'm hoping someone can say "This is a list of possible species given your location and description" and I can attempt to find a photo that matches from there.

I'm in NE Indiana. I think it was an insect. The species in question looked a bit like a leech, black and shiny but wasn't segmented and it was a bit flattened out (but not entirely), maybe an inch long. It wasn't tapered. Also I don't believe it made any attempt to bite me (or just wasn't around long enough to). Unfortunately it startled me so I smashed it pretty quickly so I didn't get a picture, but I got a good look and couldn't identify any legs, eyes, antennae. It moved fairly quickly, almost in a pulsating motion. When I smashed it, there was only a bit of white, mealy paste left behind, the body almost seemed to liquefy.

If it hadn't moved so quickly and wasn't so small I'd have thought it was a baby slug. It's possible it could have been some sort of larvae.

I also don't think it was a leech because I found it on my body but I was in my home and can't think where I could have been that would have exposed me to one. I noticed it when after removing my shirt and lying in bed. So it was either inside my shirt for several hours without me noticing, fell out from the covers when I got in bed, or fell from somewhere after I got in bed.

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This is not easy to answer without a picture. However, if it was unsegmented, it was definitely not an insect (which have a segmented body plan, both as larvae/nymph and adult). Your description also sounds nothing like an insect. However, the overall description fits fairly well with a flatworm (Phyluym: Plathelminthes), see e.g. Geoplanidae. They can resemble slugs or leeches, but both lack segmentation and antenna. Finding one inside your house sounds a bit strange though, as they generally prefer moist habitats.

Terrestial flatworms are relatively mobile and most are predators or scavengers

Example pictures:
enter image description here
enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Okay that makes sense. Looking at images, it looked similar to Microplana terrestris or Rhynchodemus sylvaticus But I'm not sure on the range/size of these species or the probability of encountering them in the home. $\endgroup$
    – Patrick
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ It was raining outside, is it at all possible it fell onto my clothing from some surface while outside and I just didn't notice until later, or are these likely to be low to the ground? $\endgroup$
    – Patrick
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 16:17
  • $\begingroup$ The terrestial species in Geoplanidae are quite mobile, so you might well have picked it up outside. Most species in Plathelminthes are however marine or parasites. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ I would say the bottom picture you provided look almost exactly as I remember it, with the exception of the sliminess. Could it have just been drying out? $\endgroup$
    – Patrick
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 16:24
  • $\begingroup$ @PatrickSchomburg That is definitely possible. I'm not familiar with US flatworms personally though. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 16:42

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