2
$\begingroup$

Does anyone know if this is a bedbug? Or maybe a cockroach? I am located in Quebec, Canada.

If you need a clearer picture I'll try to take one without the glass in the way so my camera can focus better. Hopefully it doesn't escape.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ where are you? country/state? $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Mar 2 '17 at 22:11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This is a woodlouse (often called a "pill bug" or "rolly polly"). See this answer for an example of an actual bed bug. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Mar 4 '17 at 5:51
11
$\begingroup$

I think I can see 5 extremities sticking out under the shield on one side in your image. Hence I think it has a total of 10 extremities. A bedbug, belonging to the class of insects, should have just 6.

I'm pretty sure it's a pill bug (Fig. 1), a family of woodlice (Armadillidiidae), belonging to the isopoda, an order of crustaceans. Crustaceans include the lobsters, crabs and crayfish, to name a few.

pill bug
Fig. 1. A Pill bug species. source: Natural History of Orange County, CA

A bed bug is an insect and has six extremities (Fig. 2).

Bed Bug
Fig. 2. A bed bug species. source: Terminix

So long story short, your species here is not an insect, and hence not a bed bug.

From the limited amount of information you've provided a specific species determination is difficult; there are many pill bugs.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thank you! After going through some pictures of the different species of pill bugs, I have found a match. $\endgroup$ – Bob Mar 2 '17 at 22:10
  • $\begingroup$ Do you any special reason to say pill bug? From the unclear picture I find that hard so say. It's clearly a woodlouse though. $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Mar 4 '17 at 19:26
5
$\begingroup$

No, it looks like a woodlouse. They are perfectly harmless to humans, and feed on decaying plant matter. They are also called isopods, roly-polies, or pill bugs.

Woodlouse on Wikipedia

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.