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Can I determine the sequence of nucleotides of the mRNA strand transcribed from a template DNA strand that goes from (5' to 3')?

I know that RNA-Polymerase enzyme cannot work but on the (3' to 5') direction of the template DNA strand. So, for instance, if the question was to:

Determine sequence of nucleotides in the transcribed mRNA from the DNA strand

5'...A-T-T-C-G-T-T-A-C....3'

Which direction should I start with?

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closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, WYSIWYG Sep 25 '17 at 7:44

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  • $\begingroup$ If that is the template strand, and you know RNAP travels along the template from 3' -> 5', you are able to determine the answer. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Mar 3 '17 at 0:40
  • $\begingroup$ And remember that the direction has to be complementary to the template strand. Or, identical to the coding strand. $\endgroup$ – Bob Mar 3 '17 at 0:48
  • $\begingroup$ @canadianer The problem is that when I got a bit confused and referred to an answer to the question, the answer was to use the complementary strand to this as a template and transcribe the mRNA strand so I just got more confused not sure if this was the right thing to do.. $\endgroup$ – Jasmin Badawy Mar 3 '17 at 0:55
  • $\begingroup$ Is the sequence you wrote the template or coding strand? $\endgroup$ – canadianer Mar 3 '17 at 3:51
  • $\begingroup$ @canadianer the question was exactly to determine the sequence of nucleotides in the transcribed mRNA from this strand of DNA molecule, doesn't that mean that this is the sequence of the template strand? $\endgroup$ – Jasmin Badawy Mar 3 '17 at 7:53
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I'm assuming you are working with a small sequence, but for larger sequences, or if you want to double check your answer, you can use tools like this one: http://www.attotron.com/cybertory/analysis/trans.htm

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