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We found this bug in a bedroom in southern California. It's small: the body is about 5mm and the length including legs and antenna could be up to about 10mm. It's mostly black, though the abdomen from the bottom appears to have gold highlights under light when I used a flashlight. In sunlight it appears somewhat brownish. It looks like it has wings which forms sort of an "X" pattern on its back. The legs are dark black or brown but may be somewhat translucent in sunlight to appear an orange-gold color.

What species is it? It looks to me a little like a plant bug (phylinae?) or roach or beetle but I'm not sure. And could this species bite?

roach roach roach roach roach in sun roach in sun roach in sun

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  • $\begingroup$ I've seen this thing too. I don't know the species, but I do know it bites. Be careful! $\endgroup$ – Aravind Suresh Apr 6 '17 at 8:55
  • $\begingroup$ This may be an assassin bug, Reduviidae. These may indeed bite. $\endgroup$ – RHA Apr 6 '17 at 19:00
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This is a plant bug (family Miridae); going deeper isn't possible on the basis of a photograph, except for some common economic species (the key to genera in How To Know the True Bugs is almost 200 couplets long!). Most species of the family are plant feeders (hence the common name); biting humans is unlikely.

Reasoning (from Comments):

The top right photo [from the OP's post] shows that the front wing has a cuneus (a section of the hardened part of the wing on the outer margin set off by a groove), which is characteristic of that family and the broad-sense "Anthocoridae" (which includes three smaller families); none of the photos show simple eyes (the eyes we see are compound), which eliminates "Anthocoridae" and the subfamily Isometopinae of Miridae; the remaining seven Nearctic subfamilies are still possible

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE and thanks for your answer. It is difficult to assess whether your answer might be correct or not. I know it is very hard to ID insects to the species level and therefore I like your conservative approach, giving the family only. But could you please still provide evidence for your claim that this species belongs to Miridae, maybe by discussing some of its characteristics and compare them to the specimen on the original question? Thank you! $\endgroup$ – AlexDeLarge May 17 '17 at 8:53
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    $\begingroup$ The top right photo here shows that the front wing has a cuneus (a section of the hardened part of the wing on the outer margin set off by a groove), which is characteristic of that family and the broad-sense "Anthocoridae" (which includes three smaller families); none of the photos show simple eyes (the eyes we see are compound), which eliminates "Anthocoridae" and the subfamily Isometopinae of Miridae; the remaining seven Nearctic subfamilies are still possible. $\endgroup$ – Arthur J Frost May 17 '17 at 22:27

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