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My textbook says:

The amino group of an amino acid reacts with the carbonyl group of another amino acid at the end of a polypeptide chain. This condensation reaction forms a peptide bond. ... The precise sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain is the primary structure of the protein.

Later, it states that

The primary structure of a protein is established by covalent bonds ...

Is the primary structure of a protein governed by covalent bonds or peptide bonds? Are peptide bonds a type of covalent bond?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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closed as off-topic by David, another 'Homo sapien', Bryan Krause, James, theforestecologist Apr 23 '17 at 2:34

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    $\begingroup$ A peptide bond is an amide bond and a covalent bond and, as far as the primary structure of proteins is concerned, it has one very important characteristic: it is planar. $\endgroup$ – user1136 Apr 16 '17 at 16:54
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Peptide bonds (also called amide bonds) are definitely covalent bonds. This is also mentioned in the first line of wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peptide_bond

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Yes. Lots of words for the same thing.

Covalent bonds are any bonds where electrons are shared. Polyamide bonds, peptide bond etc.

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