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Please, I am so itchy, I need to know: which countries are free of mosquitoes?

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closed as off-topic by David, anongoodnurse, kmm, another 'Homo sapien', WYSIWYG Apr 17 '17 at 5:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Personal medical questions and health advice are off-topic on Biology. We cannot safely answer questions for your specific situation and you should always consult a doctor for medical advice." – WYSIWYG
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  • $\begingroup$ Iceland is a good choice. $\endgroup$ – Chris Apr 16 '17 at 21:24
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    $\begingroup$ You'll get itchiness due to dry skin if you move to cold places where there are no mosquitoes. $\endgroup$ – Count Iblis Apr 16 '17 at 21:54
  • $\begingroup$ Our school geography book told that there exist mosquito in Antarctica (don't know whether t/f but iceland remembered me that). Also in several quiz-book and competitions I've seen previously that France donot have mosquito (dont no it is t/f) and there is a Quora question also on that. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Apr 17 '17 at 5:50
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According to India.com, Chris is right and Iceland has been declared mosquito free.

The science behind this is quite interesting and there are various hypotheses regarding as to why Iceland doors are shut to mosquitoes. The most preferred hypothesis by scientists, according to New York Times is >>

When mosquitoes lay eggs in cold weather, the larvae emerge with a thaw, allowing them to breed and multiply. Iceland, however, typically has three major freezes and thaws a year, creating conditions that may be too unstable for the insect’s survival.

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