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Does sunlight Kill Rotavirus? Maybe freezing? Norwalk or similar. Its a practical question for bedding.

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    $\begingroup$ So you have bedding contaminated with rotavirus? These can live more than a week in a variety of conditions. Freezing will not do the job and sunlight won't either. I'd recommend a high temperature wash/dry cycle with bleach. Most other disinfection methods will bleach your fabrics anyways. What you should really do if they're extremely soiled is discard them, however. $\endgroup$
    – CKM
    Commented May 3, 2017 at 3:09

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According to this study, both a high temperature wash (57C) and full spectrum sunlight will kill rotavirus.

It would appear that a washer with a sanitation cycle (newer models often have a cycle that hits or exceeds 165F) would be your best bet for treating bedding.

See Figure 2.enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Oof, that figure though... I presume the y-axis should be labeled "log activation"? And the units aren't FFU/mL they are plotting a dimensionless ratio of FFU(t)/FFU(0). Importantly, though, if log10(FFU(t)/FFU(0)) = -2, that's only a 99% reduction which may not be enough for OP. Still, I have trouble trusting a source that can't label their axes properly. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Commented May 9, 2017 at 20:41
  • $\begingroup$ I think it is correctly labeled. If you measure at time(t) and find 5 units still alive, and at beginning of experiment (t0) you had 100 units alive. Then log10(5/100) = log10(.05) = -1.3. A Y axis value of -2 would mean that 99% of the initial population of rotavirus was inactivated. $\endgroup$
    – akaDrHouse
    Commented May 9, 2017 at 21:43
  • $\begingroup$ Point taken about 99% not being enough though. $\endgroup$
    – akaDrHouse
    Commented May 9, 2017 at 21:44
  • $\begingroup$ The y-axis numbers are correct, the word "inactivation" is not. If "inactivation" is plotted it should be something more like [FFU(0) - FFU(t)]/FFU(0), where inactivation=0 means the FFU is unchanged from baseline. 5 units alive should be greater inactivation than 10 units alive but on the chart it is less. Clearly what they are actually plotting is activity. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Commented May 9, 2017 at 21:49
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    $\begingroup$ My concern is OP's issue has to do with bedding, whereas the paper here is testing inactivation in liquid broth or what have you. I don't think the two media are comparable. $\endgroup$
    – CKM
    Commented May 10, 2017 at 0:18

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