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I teach A&P for bio non majors. I have a special needs student whose accommodation requires a word bank for any anatomy identification questions I have on the exam. I would like to present the student with a 'master wordbank' (presumably hundreds of words in length) that would act as a word bank for all the exams in the course. I'm surprised to be unable to find much of anything online. Has anyone seen something like this?

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    $\begingroup$ The index of your textbook? $\endgroup$ – kmm May 25 '17 at 2:08
  • $\begingroup$ I agree that your textbook's index or glossary is probably your best bet. Because anatomy can be taught at so many different levels (breadth and depth) and you're teaching at a fairly basic level, you'd have a hard time finding a list elsewhere that emphasizes/includes what you want but doesn't weigh you down with terms your class does not cover $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist May 25 '17 at 14:10
  • $\begingroup$ this textbook has no such thing unfortunately $\endgroup$ – rhill45 Jul 1 '17 at 6:49
  • $\begingroup$ I've been trying to find something similiar so far all I have found is an academic headword list. victoria.ac.nz/lals/resources/academicwordlist/awl-headwords/… $\endgroup$ – John Sep 11 '17 at 23:17
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So I found a good list. Behold: wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_biology

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    $\begingroup$ If you are teaching A&P, then this list will definitely not have all possible terms. For example, there are no named muscles in this list (or at least the first 5 most obvious I searched for were not), which normally would be included in an A&P exam. $\endgroup$ – kmm Jun 13 '17 at 14:37
  • $\begingroup$ @kmm this is not A&P at harvard medical college. However, that's not good regarding the muscles. When i did some random testing I didn't cross check any of those.. do you remember a muscle you queried? $\endgroup$ – rhill45 Jul 1 '17 at 6:48
  • $\begingroup$ Look for "rectus", "biceps" and "femur". None is on that list. $\endgroup$ – kmm Jul 20 '17 at 23:17
  • $\begingroup$ @kmm To be fair they are not really headwords but specific terms for an individual object. If you want to include ALL of those you would be better off with the entire biological dictionary. $\endgroup$ – John Sep 11 '17 at 23:21
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You may want to look at some biological terminologies or ontologies. These can be browsed online using portals like the OLS or Bioportal. You can restrict your search to particular domains or sources, such as the FMA for adult human anatomy and Uberon for general metazoan and comparative anatomy. This may be overkill for your purposes, as these ontologies are intended for computational applications rather than as an educational reference source. For example, terms are linked to other terms via different relationship types. However, this extra information may turn out to be useful, and the developers of these ontologies may be interested in helping with educational use cases (I am the developer of Uberon and this is something I am interested in).

If you wanted to extract a table of terms from one of these, perhaps restricted to a domain (e.g. human muscles) then this may be possible with a bit of work with some of the online interfaces, or it's something that could be done by someone with programmatic skills. Someone on bioinformatics.stackechange.com could help with that task. Many of these are available via open and unrestrictive licenses so there should be no legal issue here.

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