1
$\begingroup$

I found it outside in the City of South India in the month of May.

enter image description here

Another view:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ That will be easier if you have pictures of the flowers and/or fruits. If you open the fruits, you may increase your chances even more. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo May 30 '17 at 1:01
  • $\begingroup$ @Rodrigo I think it is non-flowering & fruitless plant. $\endgroup$ – The Hawk May 30 '17 at 1:13
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think it is an ornamental plant. $\endgroup$ – Tyto alba May 30 '17 at 6:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ By the shape of the leaf, it surely has flowers and fruits. In the picture above, to the left, it looks like a bunch of Piperaceae fruits. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo May 30 '17 at 11:47
  • $\begingroup$ @Dhanraj Kumar All monocots and dicots flower and set seed even if you don't notice them. $\endgroup$ – Jude Jul 30 '17 at 6:25
1
$\begingroup$

No guarantee that my answer is the right one but my educated guess that your plant is a species of Acalypha. There are a number of species in this genus and I'm sorry I can't narrow it down further.

The shape of the leaves, the little 'pig-tail' shaped seed (or unopened flower) spike seen in the upper left corner of the first photo, the tinge of pink on some leaves and veins and even the twist or curl on the uppermost group of leaves leads me to think that.

I'm including some photos showing these points. Whether it's a plant in this genus is for you to decide. It would be helpful to know the size of the entire plant and he range of size in the leaves.

Acalypha wilkesiana

*Acalypha wilkesiana*

Another Acalypha wilkesiana with this one showing the 'pig-tail' flower spikes better.

enter image description here

The flower spikes are very evident in this Acalypha bamentacea here.

enter image description here

The twists and curls can be seen in this cultivar of Acalypha wilkesiana.

enter image description here Source courtesy of Dave's Garden

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

It looks vaguely hibiscus-esque, but it looks like you either have a chimera or a disease going on that makes identification difficult. The leaves in the center of both pictures do not look characteristic of the species when compared to the leaves on the edge of the photograph - the stems have lost their apical dominance and the leaves are curled and have lost their conformality. That speckling may be purposefully bred for a horticultural variety, but if it's not, it may be a symptom of whatever is causing these other troubles.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Hello, could your support your answer with online references. Supporting answers with credible references is a best-practice on Stack Exchange. $\endgroup$ – Tyto alba May 30 '17 at 20:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.