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I've been reading about how it is possible to send signals to the brain using focused ultrasound or electrical impulses. It is possible to make someone see a certain shape or color by stimulating different areas of the brain. I was wondering whether or not it would be possible to temporarily shut off a person's motor functions by for example, sending signals to the cerebellum or perhaps intercepting them before they can travel down the spinal chord.

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With in-depth study and research, it would be possible on 1 person. However, it's unlikely that this type of technology could ever be weaponized.

Nerves and neural networks are particularly known for having unique calibrations per individual. Even if you can decipher every neural communication protocol on a test subject, the signal protocol would be at least slightly different on others, even for crude movement control.

Mind control would be several orders of magnitude harder - each person's brain is different.

Most neurons communicate through neurotransmitters rather than electricity, completely ignoring your control scheme.

Even if none of these barriers existed, people could always block them using "tinfoil hats".

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Yes. Those weapons exist, they are called Electroshock weapon, the most famous of which is the taser.

Tasers spill much ink in the media. You have probably already seen their use (and misuse) in videos.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for answering, but this isn't quite what I meant. I am talking about a non-painful non-invasive procedure that can prevent movement for a desired period of time. For example, this could be used as an alternate method to sedation in a patient that is having violent involuntary convulsions, or whose movements would otherwise need to be suppressed in order to deliver treatment. $\endgroup$ – Mork Jun 11 '17 at 5:38
  • $\begingroup$ I have no sources for this, but I guess the "impact" you need to immobilize a human with this type of method will never be non-painful. $\endgroup$ – skymningen Jun 12 '17 at 8:13

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