I am provided with the two following statements and have to prove which is true and which is false.

  1. $\ce{Cl-}$ acts as a coenzyme for amylase
  2. $\ce{Zn^2+}$ acts as a prosthetic group for carbonic anhydrase

Now, I know that statement 2 is correct.

But, I'm confused why statement 1 is wrong.

I know $\ce{Cl-}$ is the cofactor for amylase, but why is it not its coenzyme?

  • On the wikipedia page (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cofactor_(biochemistry)) a coenzyme is defined as a complex oranic cofactor, so Cl- doesn't count. Another thing that doesn't make it a coenzyme (as far as I know) is that the ion is not directly involved in the catalyzed reaction. – VonBeche Jun 11 '17 at 12:28
  • @VonBeche cool! Got it now. Answer that below and i'll tick it as an accepted answer. Thanks! – Bob Smith Jun 11 '17 at 13:12

On the wikipedia page (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cofactor_(biochemistry)) a coenzyme is defined as a complex organic cofactor, so Cl⁻ doesn't count. Another thing that disqualifies it as a coenzyme is that the ion is not directly involved in the catalyzed reaction. This amylase contains both a calcium ion, involved in catalysis. The chloride is speculated only to be involved in differentiation between substrates, and is absent in other structures.

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