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Invading Bacteria are phagocytosed by phagocytes. Phagocytes are specialised white cells. But, if a non-phagocyte cells are infected with bacteria how those cells handle this situation? Do they succumb to the bacteria?

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For cells to become infected with bacteria, some bacteria will still be present in the blood. These are still engulfed by phagocytes in the same fashion. However once engulfed the antigens on the surface of the Bacteria are placed on the surface of the phagocyte, this is known as an antigen presenting cell (APC). Specialized lymphocytes known as Th Cells bind to these antigens and then divide. These then stimulate Cytotoxic T cells which secrete a chemical known as perforin. The perforin makes holes on the membrane of 'non-phagocyte' infected cells allowing water to enter. This essentially causes the cell and the bacteria to explode, known as cell lysis.

So basically the infected cell is simply destroyed unless hydrolytic enzymes break down the Bacteria.

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