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I am currently trying to find out what type of flies are flying around in my home. If they are fruit flies, fungus gnats or something else.

Currently my Droseraa caught one of them and I am currious what species it is.

enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description here

It is a small fly, like fruits flies and fungus gnats. As seen in the third photo the length is about 1,5 to 2mm (The distance between each line is 1mm).

The location is Stockholm in Sweden (in my apartment).

Could you help me identifying it?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you get a closeup of the wing? With what is visible at the moment, the best anyone can do is suborder. $\endgroup$ – Arthur J Frost Jun 24 '17 at 13:17
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your answer! I have now added a zoomed in picture of the flies wings. $\endgroup$ – eternitysharp Jun 24 '17 at 14:04
  • $\begingroup$ See here: biology.meta.stackexchange.com/a/3683/27148 and try to provide location and size information as well. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Jun 24 '17 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your comment! I have updated with location and size. I have a picture avaible with the fly close to a ruler, but can't add it as I only have 1 in reputation. $\endgroup$ – eternitysharp Jun 25 '17 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ @eternitysharp You now have more reputation. I don't know if this is enough to add more pictures. $\endgroup$ – bli Jun 26 '17 at 7:38
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This is a Dark-winged fungus gnat (family Sciaridae); the European species of the family are dealt with by Menzel, F.; Mohrig, W., 1999, Revision der paläarktischen Trauermücken (Diptera, Sciaridae) [A Revision of the Palaearctic Black Fungus Gnats (Diptera: Sciaridae)], Studia Dipterologica Supplement, (6):761 pages; copies are sold by Ampyx-Verlag (see http://www.ampyx-verlag.de/lilac_cms/de/4852,,refz,rd,368,2914,12/index.html). Some species of the family have economic importance, but identification to species usually requires male specimens which must be at least temporarily mounted on microscope slides.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your answer! I think I am good enough with just knowing the family. I will change the question from "species" to "family" and then accept your answer. $\endgroup$ – eternitysharp Jun 26 '17 at 20:48

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