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I have killed maybe 5 of these little bastards as I have a 3 year old and dont want her bit. Should be able to zoom in quite a bit. Just hold CTRL and hit the plus symbol.

Whitish top brown legs stripped maybe yellow or white on the butt with black Seen them all times of the day.

Kinda reminds me of the ant-mimic spider but I am unsure, need assistance.

enter image description here

And a close up:

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Please edit your question and add some more details. You say you'rein Idaho, OK, but when do these spiders appear? What part of the year? How large are they? $\endgroup$ – terdon Jul 6 '17 at 10:02
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    $\begingroup$ Well, if I am posting about it now that would imply now. So Summer, July, Size of a penny. $\endgroup$ – user33775 Jul 6 '17 at 16:44
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    $\begingroup$ It might imply now today but not next time someone stumbles across this question. And making things explicit will only help you get an answer. In any case, please edit your question to add this information as requested. Comments are hard to read, easy to miss and can be deleted without warning. $\endgroup$ – terdon Jul 6 '17 at 16:50
  • $\begingroup$ First thought that comes to mind is a Parson Spider, but not quite.. the fact that there's a blemish on the plastic of your vacuum cleaner (lol) makes it a bit difficult to assess the full pattern on the abdomen of the spider. $\endgroup$ – user22020 Sep 7 '17 at 5:28
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I'm just about 100% certain that this is a Hobo Spider, which belongs to the species Eratigena agrestis. As stated in my comment, the blemish on the vacuum cleaner's plastic makes it difficult to observe the full pattern on the spider's abdomen, which would have otherwise made for a much quicker identification.

Once realized though, the distinguishing feature for me was in fact the pattern on the abdomen. If you look at the picture I provide and consider at the abdomen, it looks like a face with two eyes, a mouth, some hair, and a beard; i.e., a hobo. Now look at the picture in the OP -- the exact same "face" can be seen, excluding the right "eye" of the hobo (our left), due to the blemish on the vacuum's plastic. The "hair" at the pedicel, the down-turned "mouth", and the "beard", are all visible in both images, and are near perfect matches. The legs, overall body coloration, size & proportionalities, and slight discoloration on the cephalothorax, also match.

I had to maximize the OPs image to 200% zoom to get a detailed enough view of the spider to then make these conclusions.

enter image description here

This species spider is most commonly found in your region, that being north west USA, however, they've also been seen in Asia and Europe. And as for if this is a venomous spider (since you're concerned about your daughter): according to Wiki, this kind of spider doesn't bite unless forced to defend itself, and, the CDC does not consider it to be dangerously venomous.

enter image description here

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It seems to be a male barn funnel weaver, according to a quick google search. The main part of this picture that leads me to believe that is the first segment of the leg, closest to the body, is darker than the rest. Funnel Weaver This is the a male barn funnel weaver, with the same darker segments. And yes, I looked at the list specifically for Idaho

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    $\begingroup$ Answers to species ID questions need a lot more content than this. You need to convince us that your ID is correct, explain why that ID applies over other IDs, and hopefully provide some convincing pictures. Note that species ID is quite difficult, especially for arthropods due to incredible diversity and many similar body plans for distinct species (and even genera). $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Jul 6 '17 at 21:56
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If user22020 is 100% sure that's a hobo spider, then I'm 101% sure that's a stealthy ground spider. The source of user22020's picture actually labeled it as such. enter image description here It's definitely in the ground spider family, just like Parsons spiders.

Hobo spiders and barn funnelweavers are more well-known, but both are brown, not black and white, and have vastly different patterning than yours. Stealthy ground spider are not famous because they, like most Idaho spiders, are not dangerous.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Can you elaborate why you think your identification is correct? For example, discuss the key features that helped you come to this conclusion and provide references that support your assertions. ——— You might also want to take the tour and then consult the help pages for additional advice on How to Answer questions effectively on this site and then edit your answer accordingly. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Oct 20 '19 at 19:17

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