18
$\begingroup$

Sharks normally respond very quickly to the scent of blood in up to a mile radius, but what if the shark itself simply got injured? Would it respond to its own blood at all?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ That would mean the real question is: why not? How could they automatically distinguish their own blood from that of another shark or fish? Would simply knowing it got injured be enough? $\endgroup$ – RayOfHope Jul 8 '17 at 20:11
  • $\begingroup$ Great question +1 $\endgroup$ – Mockingbird Jul 9 '17 at 1:03
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I would think no, given that the shark would detect the blood in such close proximity, and then upon looking around, not see any other sealife. And as for the shark having some sensativity towards detecting its own blood vs others, sharks have no such ability. Also, just as a side note, I believe I had read several articles stating "one mile radius" is actually something closer to "a quarter mile radius", and is greatly dependent on the diffusion rate of the blood as it travels through the ocean currents. $\endgroup$ – Charles Aug 7 '17 at 11:46
1
$\begingroup$

I'm pretty sure, they can smell their own blood, but they do not attack themselves. Wounding a fish results in the release of chemicals into the water. This is a signal for other fish about potential danger and they will escape (Schreckstoff). Of course, the predator of the wounded fish will not mind. So this seems to work best within the same species. Fishermen and military have apparently used dead or rotten sharks in the past to keep sharks from attacking (Shark repellent). I guess, a similar mechanism plays a role here. Sensing a wounded member of the same or close species (including oneself), would block any feeding behavior.

The Myth Busters have actually done this (not very scientific) experiment: https://youtu.be/E1GenfKR9pk

$\endgroup$
-3
$\begingroup$

Yes, sadly they do as the smell of fishes blood turns them into a frenzy, as they are fish.But i see no reason the shark would get hurt in the first place.

$\endgroup$
-3
$\begingroup$

It is likely not the case that there would be a feeding frenzy if the question is whether a shark would attack an injured member of it's own family or species. The main reason is for reproductive means as a video will explain on this website: https://sharkopedia.discovery.com/shark-topics/life-cycle/#how-do-sharks-avoid-inbreeding

Although there could be a few exceptions. Semelparity in female tiger sharks for instance, has been observed. Information about all sharks pertaining to this matter is difficult to come by.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This doesn't answer the question, which is clearly about the response of a shark to its own blood. $\endgroup$ – Michael_A Dec 28 '17 at 1:42
  • $\begingroup$ The question is what if the shark itself simply got injured? Would there be a freezing frenzy? And the answer I'm suggesting is no. The shark wouldn't eat itself for the same reason.. $\endgroup$ – Daniel O'Hearn Dec 29 '17 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ They prefer not to fight with members of their own species. $\endgroup$ – Daniel O'Hearn Dec 29 '17 at 19:39
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The question is Would a shark whip into a frenzy from smelling its OWN blood? The first sentence of your answer incorrectly restates the question by ending thus; if the question is whether a shark would attack an injured member of it's own family or species. My initial comment was made so you knew the reason for a down-vote and could consider editing the answer. $\endgroup$ – Michael_A Dec 31 '17 at 2:16

protected by Chris Apr 2 '18 at 20:01

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.