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If the action potential is an "all or nothing" phenomenon, then how is one type of neurotransmitter secreted rather than another? Let's say, for example, if a neuron received an excitatory post synaptic potential that initiated a graded potential that initiated an action potential, what specific signaling cascade or mechanism would denote the release of one excitatory neurotransmitter (say nor-epinephrine) over another (say dopamine) ?

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how is one type of neurotransmitter secreted rather than another

Most neurons release a single major neurotransmitter. JM97 commented a link about cells releasing more than one, but that is talking about "extra" neurotransmitters are short peptides, different from the major neurotransmitters like glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, etc - I think that link is very misleading in the context of your question. Those cells don't choose one or the other, they release their primary neurotransmitter plus the peptide.

However, there are lots of different neurons and lots of different TYPES of neurons, so some release one type of neurotransmitter, others release another. Typically this is denoted by refering to cells as "___ergic": GABAergic cells release GABA, glutamatergic cells release glutamate, etc. Those specific cell types express the proteins necessary to synthesize their neurotransmitters and transport them into synaptic vesicles, ready to release. The actual signalling cascade that results in vesicle release is pretty much the same across different neurons: the difference is in what is packaged into those synaptic vesicles.

if a neuron received an excitatory post synaptic potential that initiated a graded potential that initiated an action potential what specific signaling cascade or mechanism would denote the release of one excitatory neurotransmitter (say nor-epinephrine) over another (say dopamine) ?

Simple: if the action potential is fired by a noradrenergic cell, that cell will release norepinephrine on all of its targets. If the action potential is fired by a dopaminergic cell, that cell will release dopamine on all of its targets. They are different cells.

In contrast to outputs, which use a single primary neurotransmitter, individual cells can receive inputs from many types of neurotransmitter. So a dopaminergic cell could receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs and also receive glutamatergic excitatory inputs, but it will only release dopamine on its targets.

If you have a network, and you wanted that network to release more dopamine on average, you would increase the synaptic weights of the excitatory inputs to dopaminergic cells: that is, increase the amplitude of EPSPs in those cells (you could possibly also reduce the inhibition).

In the title of your question, you asked how "finely tuned signals" can be sent. Tuning of signals isn't just about which neurotransmitter is released, but rather which cells that neurotransmitter is released on to. Individual cells can both receive 1000s of inputs and send outputs to 1000s of other cells. The patterns of those connections and the patterns of active cells are what determine the "message" - this is called "encoding".

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