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When DNA polymorphism occurs mutations can take place. If these mutations occur in the germ cell and do not destroy its capability to reproduce, it is said that the mutation might move on to the next generation. My book says it might lead to allele sequence variation. But what does it mean?

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  • $\begingroup$ You should take a look at this question; and specifically, my answer, as it explains the relationship between mutation and variation, and will help you better understand what your book is talking about. biology.stackexchange.com/questions/43159/… $\endgroup$ – user22020 Aug 2 '17 at 15:15
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Can you please give a direct quote? I am pretty sure your textbook did not say exactly what you said!

When DNA polymorphism occurs mutations can take place.

In genetics, polymorphism just refer to the existence of genetic variation among individuals in a population (often referring to a specific locus).

Mutations is the ultimate source of polymorphism. It is not polymorphism that allow mutations to occur.

If these mutations occur in the germ cell and do not destroy its capability to reproduce, it is said it might move on to the next generation.

Indeed!

My book says it might lead to allele sequence variation.

'allele sequence variation' is just some kind of another generic term for polymorphism. For this expression to make sense to you, you should start by looking up the definition of allele

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