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This question is mainly applicable to beetle's and cockroaches. If I flip them so their legs point upward, they usually squirm around and wiggle trying to come back upright. Sometimes they succeed, and turn right side up again; sometimes they don't. Do insects have any built in mechanisms to unflip themselves.

I was unable to find any sources, but I believe they should, since insects climb stuff, and they may land inverted if they fall, so a mechanism might've been evolved to unflip themselves.

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    $\begingroup$ Why don't you consider their attempts to come back upright as a mechanism to do so? If they are having difficulty, it might be because artificial surfaces provide an environment they have not experienced over evolutionary time: that is, very flat surfaces, with no debris around for traction. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Aug 3 '17 at 3:35
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    $\begingroup$ Why don't you consider their attempts to come back upright as a mechanism to do so? I could attempt to fly, although I'd die if I tried, since I have no mechanisms (wings, hollow bones) to fly. $\endgroup$ – Twisted Genes Aug 3 '17 at 7:10
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    $\begingroup$ @Pritt Air is not the natural fluid for us to fly, you would fly if you change the fluid to water( that is swimming). Hope u understand the analogy. $\endgroup$ – JM97 Aug 3 '17 at 14:41
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    $\begingroup$ You seem to have skipped the second half of my statement. I think your question is a bit like putting a human on glare ice, perfectly smooth, and asking them to try to run. Then, when they slip and fall, you ask "Do mammals have mechanisms to keep themselves from falling while running?" $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Aug 3 '17 at 16:24
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    $\begingroup$ I'm suggesting that the beetles and cockroaches you see are probably only struggling because you have them on a very flat surface. In natural environments there are almost always going to be other things around to grab on to. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Aug 4 '17 at 0:53
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Well, many insects have developed ways to right themselves when they get turned over.

One of the more interesting families are the Elateridae, or click beetles: so named because they press their prosternum and mesosternum against each other which causes pressure. That pressure is eventually released causing a "clicking" sound and springing the insect upward (or away from predators).

https://thumbs.gfycat.com/EllipticalWeeIchthyosaurs-size_restricted.gif

You can see an additional video of a click beetle doing so here.

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