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After looking up how long germs live for on surface, I came across lots of resources that explain how long germs live on different surfaces.

A common pattern is that germs survive longer on cold/hard surfaces than on skin.

Why is that?

Wouldn't skin be a much more hospitable environment than something like a desk?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm pretty sure that will vary a lot from a surface to another. Can you please develop stating what surface you are talking about and also linked to your sources. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 18 '17 at 22:00
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    $\begingroup$ Not only will it vary from surface to surface, but will vary with microorganisms as well. I think this is too broad. If you can narrow it down to one microorganism, or provide your source, this might be better. $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Aug 19 '17 at 14:58
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because some skin cells which are alive , secret fat and other materials , these materials make the skin acidic , and acidic environment is not good for many germs , on the other hand , there is an enzyme in sweat (lysozyme)which destroy the wall of bacteria

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    $\begingroup$ Source, please? $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Aug 19 '17 at 11:42
  • $\begingroup$ My explanation is partly mentioned in ,junqueira basic histology , chapter skin , part protection and sweat glands , but the whole explanation exists in a book which was taugt in my college and that is not a reference book, unfortunately. $\endgroup$ – minasi Aug 19 '17 at 12:04
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    $\begingroup$ You might be an ESL (so am I) but please note that in english (and in most other language using the lating alphabeth), sentences start with a capitalize letter and end with a dot. Comas are not preceded by a space and closing parenthesis are followed by a space. Don't forget to conjugate your verbs (destroy). I think you meant secrete and not secret. we dont write like dis on StackExchange. The term germ is never use in Biology. I suppose you meant pathogens. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 19 '17 at 15:22
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    $\begingroup$ Ok, thanks for your attention. I will be more careful next time. $\endgroup$ – minasi Aug 19 '17 at 16:04
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    $\begingroup$ @minasi Btw, if english is not your mother tongue, I'd be curious what language actually puts spaces before commas. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 20 '17 at 0:26

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