1
$\begingroup$

What is the medical definition of death? And how do medical examiners determine whether a person has really deceased, as opposed to for example a condition like brain death?

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think is mainly opinion based. Even medically there are different definitions or versions of death (cardiopulmonary death and brain death). $\endgroup$ – Nicolai Aug 20 '17 at 15:12
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Your question has been asked in a similar form before. Check out this thread: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/43554/… - you might find a useful answer there. Full disclosure: top answer is mine. $\endgroup$ – Forest Aug 20 '17 at 15:29
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ You might be better asking how we define and determine death. $\endgroup$ – John Aug 20 '17 at 15:29
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ To rephrase @John's comment, you might be better asking "What are the most common ways we define death?" $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 20 '17 at 16:09
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ From the deleted answer of Kawin M came this link to Quora $\endgroup$ – AliceD Aug 20 '17 at 18:17
-1
$\begingroup$

Ok. So when a doctor declares a person dead, it is when their heart or brain is totally not working, and won't start working no matter what they do.

This is legal death.

If your heart stops cold, you are clinically dead. This is reversible, if you are lucky. This definition basically only exists so people can say they "died". It has no real biological significance, except for the fact that your heart is not pumping blood and providing you with oxygen. This will cause...

Biological death: Within 5-10 minutes at room temp you have reached the event horizon of biological death. Biological death is real death.

Once this time threshold is crossed, there is almost always no going back. This is because Cells in the brain are destroyed by oncosis, and other mechanisms and forces far beyond me.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Can you add your sources? $\endgroup$ – AliceD Aug 21 '17 at 12:34
  • $\begingroup$ @AliceD I mean, it's kind of common knowledge. $\endgroup$ – 4D Neuron Sep 4 '17 at 16:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.