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A year or so ago, a spider that may have been a recluse, wolf or hobo (or anything visually similar), crawled up onto my bed. We locked eyes for a moment, and then it charged at me.

I don't recall whether I killed it or captured and released it, but it is definitely the most aggressive spider I've ever encountered. In fact, I've never known any spider to proactively attack (large mammals such as myself).

Is this a normal or even precedented behavior (in common species of spider in the U.S.)? Is there any specific reason that a spider might behave this way?

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No, spiders do not charge at people or mammals to attack them. They can sometimes bite a mammal if the mammal is pinching one of its legs.

Spiders often run towards shadows. For many spiders, their eyes are merely light censors and darkness is a familiar safe spot for them. Many people misinterpret a spider's sprint towards them as some kind of 'charge' while it is usually an attempt to run to safety and not an act of aggression.

The spider family that you speculate on could be reduced if you include geography as the Hobo spider and brown recluse do not really share much distribution region. Wolf spiders can be found throughout North America, though.

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