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can dissolving be endothermic process. I have a container with glucose(solid state) and added water and found the container getting colder. was wondering there is no reaction(just a physical process) and why would it absorb heat.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, it can. This a question for Chemistry. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Sep 13 '17 at 23:14
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The answer to your question in general is yes.
There are many salts and compounds that are endothermic - they cool the solution when they dissolve. It also turns out that glucose is endothermic when it dissolves if this sheet i found is to be believed. Its not a strong effect but you made an accurate observation!

Endothermic salts can be quite cold. This is how home ice cream makers often work in fact - rock salt dissolves into the ice and makes it even colder than it started out to be. I believe that is how ice cream was made before refrigeration and ice storage arrived in the 19th century.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome back! How have you been? How's the company going? $\endgroup$ – AliceD Sep 29 '17 at 7:42
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    $\begingroup$ thanks Alice! very well - raising funds for a new startup... $\endgroup$ – shigeta Oct 6 '17 at 15:10

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