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This question already has an answer here:

I know that simple organisms containing of just few cells have no mechanism of dying because of aging. I guess, they typically die due to being out of food or due to becoming someone else's food.

Leaving aside the numerous theories of what can be the origin of such phenomenon as aging, I'm asking a simple question: what is the most primitive organism known so far which has the feature of aging and (as a consequence) dying, even if the environment is perfect?

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marked as duplicate by Bryan Krause, David, anongoodnurse, canadianer, kmm Sep 16 '17 at 12:52

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  • $\begingroup$ I feel it's essentially a dupe of question mentioned by Remi, as OP could easily call bacteria simplest organisms. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Sep 14 '17 at 21:42
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The adjective primitive is undefined, at least when comparing extant species. We have all gone through almost 4 billions years of evolution.

I would suspect you would consider a bacteria quite primitive though, so note that bacteria appears to age (see Do bacteria die of old age?).

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