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I came across this video claiming that fructose is like a poison with detailed explanation on how it is metabolized. With a search on internet I found an article which challenges the claim and sounds convincing. In the article I also learned that the original claim was made by Dr. Robert Lustig.

Dr Lustig is a scientist and the article is not a peer reviewed scientific article. I am not an expert in the field and I am not sure which side is right.

Could you tell me which side is right?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is definitely better of Skeptics.SE $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Sep 16 '17 at 2:22
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Everything is a poison with the right dosage Here is a fun chart you can use to see what I mean. Even water is poisonous if you drink enough of it.

fructose in no more poisonous than glucose. No study has shown fructose to be dangerous when eaten in normal healthy diet. It is poisonous but only in the sense that water is poisonous if you drink to much of it.

And you should reread your own source the article concludes it is NOT more poisonous than glucose. It also concluded that the paper that claimed so was erroneous because it used animals with different metabolic pathways and the differences were not significant in any case. Nor is it possible to eat a diet high in fructose without it also being high in glucose (see above study) so it would not be an issue even IF Dr. Lustig was right about the lipid metabolism.

News media loves to focus on single isolated studies with odd conclusions which is basically the worst way to represent science, wrong or erroneous things get published all the time and get quickly found out but the media tend to latch on to the former and never report the latter.

Processed sugar is bad for you for completely different reasons, basically the same reasons donuts and bacon are bad for you, they are empty calories, it is just that Americans (and a few others) eat way way more refined sugar than the other two, absurd levels of it, for comparison it is as if you were eating large amounts of bacon for every meal levels of absurd. There is also the aspect of diabetes which has to do with how much and how often we eat sugar not an issue with the sugar itself. (if we instead ate half a pound of bacon grease every day that would be the thing causing problems.)

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    $\begingroup$ What makes processed sugar worse than the same sugar in a fruit? It is the dose what make the poison, as you say. $\endgroup$ – Chris Sep 16 '17 at 9:42
  • $\begingroup$ It is the fact you are getting a lot of sugar and nothing else, with fruit you are getting vitamins, fiber, even small amounts of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids that both slow down how fast you absorb it(blood sugar rises slower) and help make you feel full so you eat less. for instance you would have to eat about 3 apples to get the same sugar as an average (~300cal)candy bar or one bottle of soda but three apple would fill you up and take longer to digest. taking longer to digest gives our insulin levels a chance to compensate for the rise in sugar and helps us eat less. $\endgroup$ – John Sep 16 '17 at 13:27
  • $\begingroup$ But that doesn't maker sugar per se bad, but the way of nutrition. $\endgroup$ – Chris Sep 16 '17 at 15:28
  • $\begingroup$ sugar is an essential part of nutrition you need a certain amount of sugar, you need a certain amount of lipids as well,eating bacon is not inherently unhealthy, but eating a tub of bacon grease would be bad for you. It would be impossible to eat a tub worth of grease by eating bacon you would get full first, by separating the grease it becomes much much easier to eat to much. The same is happening with sugar by separating it from the fruit, we can easily eat to much of it. which is what american especially are doing, mostly by adding it to everything. It is even added to many meats. $\endgroup$ – John Sep 16 '17 at 23:07

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