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I'm so embarrassed to ask such a question here, but our molecular biology teacher told us that a double helix of DNA was composed of two DNA molecules linked together by hydrogen bonds. The thing is, until now, I always thought a DNA molecule was composed of two strands, those being polynucleotides, both of them being linked together, and I can't find a link which is saying the same as my teacher, even if it seems technically correct to call a double helix a dimer of two DNA molecules.

So, yeah, that question may sound unimportant and stupid as hell, but I was curious to know what was the exact terminology. Please don't downvote me for that... I already have a low reputation, so let's not make it worse please. :)

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  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps you misheard DNA for RNA. It is very common in low level classes to call DNA two RNA strands put together, which is kind of true. Like most science, it's always a little more complicated than you were previously taught. $\endgroup$ – fredsbend Sep 29 '17 at 20:34
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As you pointed out, though this may be basic biology, seeking clarification when receiving conflicting information is a good thing. Don't feel embarrassed for asking. :)


.. our molecular biology teacher told us that a double helix of DNA was composed of two DNA molecules linked together by hydrogen bonds.

Respectfully, your teacher is incorrect. A single, double-stranded DNA molecule is comprised of two helical shaped polynucleotides, and are connected together via hydrogen bonding.


Highlight of each polynucleotide

enter image description here


Highlight of hydrogen bonding

enter image description here


And just for further validation, according to Molecular Biology of the Cell, 4th ed., by Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, et al.:

A DNA molecule consists of two long polynucleotide chains composed of four types of nucleotide subunits. Each of these chains is known as a DNA chain, or a DNA strand. Hydrogen bonds between the base portions of the nucleotides hold the two chains together.

So, it would seem that your teacher is referring to each polynucleotide, a.k.a. DNA strand, as a DNA molecule. Instead, she should use the verbiage: a single DNA molecule is composed of two DNA strands, which are helical-shaped polynucleotides.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you very much, especially for being so nice and for your very clear explanation :) you're awesome! \o/ $\endgroup$ – justdoit Sep 29 '17 at 13:31
  • $\begingroup$ the easy way to remember this to think of RNA which is a single stranded polynucleotide. $\endgroup$ – John Sep 29 '17 at 14:04
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    $\begingroup$ @paracetamol on the flip side, there is single-stranded DNA too, so... :P $\endgroup$ – another 'Homo sapien' Sep 30 '17 at 7:09
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    $\begingroup$ @another So there is, so there is... :D $\endgroup$ – paracetamol Sep 30 '17 at 7:10
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    $\begingroup$ What I was trying to say is that the teacher wasn't completely wrong, she just failed to explain her terminology properly :) $\endgroup$ – another 'Homo sapien' Sep 30 '17 at 7:15
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Hmm, I think that the teacher is actually correct and that the previous explanation, although very nicely referring to text book diagrams, is a little misleading.

The issue here is the nature of a hydrogen bond within the DNA structure. Within a chemical context, generally a molecule is a collection of atoms primarily bonded together via covalent bonds. Hydrogen bonds, by their very nature are transient - if they weren't then the double stranded DNA wouldn't be able to opened for reading! So, a strand of DNA, from the 5' end to the 3' end is one molecule. The reverse complement strand to this is another molecule of DNA. This is important as if you were carrying out a PCR reaction (for example), you would use single, stranded DNA as primers - so this would be a molecule of DNA. Also, if we were to use hydrogen bonds as a means of defining a molecular species, then water would only be one molecule - all of those H2O molecules interact via hydrogen bonds with each other!

But what about the double helix structure? Well this is a consequence of the chemical structure of each nucleotide (and the chemical properties of those atoms), aided by the hydrogen bonding to tightly pack the atoms together - it's a form taken by the thermodynamics of the inter-molecular interactions between the two molecules of DNA.

So, a strand of DNA is a molecule. Two strands (two molecules) of DNA give us the natural, stable, helical form.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't see how my answer is misleading, and at no point did you directly identify the portion(s) of my response that you then claim to correct. It would be nice if you could do this. $\endgroup$ – Charles Sep 29 '17 at 18:00
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    $\begingroup$ The IUPAC definition of molecule is "An electrically neutral entity consisting of more than one atom (n > 1). Rigorously, a molecule, in which n > 1 must correspond to a depression on the potential energy surface that is deep enough to confine at least one vibrational state. " goldbook.iupac.org/html/M/M04002.html So unless the two strands are held together too weakly to confine at least one vibrational state (which is not the case) the two hydrogen-bonded strands are one molecule. $\endgroup$ – DavePhD Sep 29 '17 at 18:04
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    $\begingroup$ "Hydrogen bonds, by their very nature are transient .." -- although generally true, there are many opposing examples, with the first to mind being HF. ". This is important as if you were carrying out a PCR reaction (for example), you would use single, stranded DNA as primers - so this would be a molecule of DNA." -- PCR methods don't match how DNA behaves naturally, specifically in that PCR separates both strands entirely all together, whereas naturally occurring separation involves a replication fork, meaning that a great portion, if not almost all, of the DNA remains double-stranded. $\endgroup$ – Charles Sep 29 '17 at 18:11
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    $\begingroup$ "So, a strand of DNA is a molecule. Two strands (two molecules) of DNA give us the natural, stable, helical form." -- Notice how you keep saying "molecules of DNA", and not "DNA molecules". The OPs teacher didn't use this verbiage, which is important because the two have quite different implications. Additionally, nobody has claimed that the single strands of DNA couldn't be considered as molecules in and of themselves, except perhaps @canadianer =P. No offense, but with respect to you singling out my answer, I believe your response presents a straw man's argument against it. $\endgroup$ – Charles Sep 29 '17 at 18:31
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    $\begingroup$ @canadianer Isn't there an isoelectric point where it is neutral? $\endgroup$ – DavePhD Sep 29 '17 at 18:40

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