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I know that soap kills bacteria by dissolving their membrane. But it is not 100% effective. A small portion of bacteria which survive replicates and I have to wash my hands again.

Will this cycle lead to evolution of soap-resistant bacteria with insoluble membranes?

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  • $\begingroup$ Different from common believe, handwashing will only reduce the number of bacteria on your hands but not eliminate them. Have a look on surgeons and their practice to wash hands and sterilize them. And this is not a problem, bacteria live normally on our skin and belong there. $\endgroup$ – Chris Oct 11 '17 at 16:36
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soap isn't a germ killer.

soap is a germ REMOVER. it is basically made of things a lot like phospholipids, that bury their fat loving tails into germs, and their water loving heads stick into the water, making whatever is in the capsule called a "micelle" super slippery,and they wash away.

the cool thing about this is it removes even non living gunk (sometimes).

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Not all soap kills bacteria, not all soaps work the same

actually, the rinsing, rubbing, and temperature of the water significantly contribute the removal and termination of bacteria even then this is not 100%.

I wouldn't want to touch blood with AIDS virus or Ebola and rely solely on soap and hand washing to save the day.

Some soaps work by raising the PH and there are already a category of organisms called Alkaliphiles which thrive in high PH environments. To my knowledge these cant really harm you as you are a low PH organism.

But yes theoretically if you use the same measure against a bacterium long enough and constantly give it a chance to succeed, eventually it will.

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