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I have been reading articles by various sources, and they seem to interchangeably call the U1/U2/U4/U6 compounds involved in RNA splicing snRNPs as well as snRNAs.

This confuses me deeply. They must only be one or the other, no? Thank you in advance!

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closed as off-topic by David, kmm, anongoodnurse, Remi.b, James Nov 13 '17 at 17:55

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  • $\begingroup$ Another post with no reference supporting your assertion and no evidence of an attempt to solve a trivial question of nomenclature that an internet search would have answered. Please discontinue this practice. $\endgroup$ – David Oct 21 '17 at 0:16
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is a trivial question about nomenclature that is easily solved by an internet search. $\endgroup$ – David Oct 21 '17 at 0:17
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snRNA: small nuclear ribonucleic acid

snRNP: small nuclear ribonucleoprotein

snRNA refers to the RNA itself. snRNP refers to snRNA complexed with some protein(s). You could call spliceosomal RNA either depending on the context.

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Most small and large RNAs typically exist and function in complex with proteins as ribonucleoprotein particles so the second denomination is more appropriate.

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