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I'm a guy and I decided to donate blood because of persuasion. My testicles feel weak afterwards specifically. I mean they feel like they're compensating -- assuming that makes sense.

Is this because significant blood volume loss would affect testosterone? Are the testes working harder to produce testosterone after a loss of so much blood from the body?

I also feel a little weaker overall as well, but the question focuses on testosterone. Clarification?

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closed as off-topic by AliceD Nov 16 '17 at 10:51

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Personal medical questions and health advice are off-topic on Biology. We cannot safely answer questions for your specific situation and you should always consult a doctor for medical advice." – AliceD
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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No, on the contrary donating blood increases testosterone levels in blood.
Testosterone actually decreases the level of the iron-regulatory hormone; hepcidin, allowing for more iron to be absorbed from foods. This is one of the reasons why men tend to have higher hemoglobin levels and larger blood volume than women do but over the time excessive amounts of iron in body can suppress the function of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and testicular leydig- and sertoli-cells, resulting in lowered testosterone levels. Donating blood reduces excess iron build in men and boost testosterone level in blood. Sometimes people who donate blood notice a few minor side effects like weakness, nausea, light-headedness, dizziness, or fainting, but these symptoms usually go away quickly. These symptoms occur because the donor's body usually replaces the liquid part of blood (plasma) within 72 hours after giving blood. It generally takes about 4–8 weeks to regenerate the red blood cells lost during a blood donation.

References http://knowledgeofhealth.com/to-boost-testosterone-maybe-donate-blood/ https://www.anabolicmen.com/iron-and-testosterone/

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